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The Documentary

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The Documentary album cover
01
Intro To The Documentary
0:33
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02
Westside Story
3:43
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03
Dreams
4:46
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04
Hate It Or Love It
3:26
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05
Higher
4:05
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06
How We Do
3:56
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07
Don't Need Your Love
4:26
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08
Church For Thugs
4:01
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09
Put You On The Game
4:14
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10
Start From Scratch
4:07
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11
The Documentary
4:11
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12
Runnin'
4:27
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13
No More Fun And Games
2:38
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14
We Ain't
4:47
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15
Where I'm From
3:08
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16
Special
3:57
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17
Don't Worry
4:11
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18
Like Father, Like Son
5:27
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Album Information
EXPLICIT // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 70:03

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Wondering Sound

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Jayson Greene

Managing Editor

Jayson Greene is Managing Editor at Wondering Sound and a contributing editor and columnist at Pitchfork. His writing has also appeared in GQ, the Village Voice...more »

11.16.10
A knucklehead rides the wave
2005 | Label: Aftermath

In 2005, 50 Cent's G-Unit empire was riding a wave. With his 2003 Aftermath debut Get Rich Or Die Tryin', 50 had gone platinum more times from one album than any rapper likely ever will again — it sold 10 million copies, a number that scans like pure science fiction today. His two protégés, the scowling NY punchline rapper Lloyd Banks and the wild-eyed Southerner Young Buck, also went platinum, an unusual distinction that turned… read more »

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They Say All Music Guide

Once the Game surfaced as a force in hip-hop, a big deal was made of his dance with death. Apparently he was shot five times. If you’re scoring at home, that’s four times less than label mate and executive producer 50 Cent. After the altercation that nearly took his life, the Game took a crash course in hip-hop and studied up on the master MCs from both coasts. Within a year of rapping for the first time, Dr. Dre took notice and was compelled to offer an Aftermath contract. The Game is also from Compton, just like his mentor, so guess where the allegiances fall? An N.W.A medallion hangs from his neck, an N.W.A logo is inked across his chest, and an image of the late Eazy-E is on his right forearm. If none of this makes it clear enough, the Game name drops beloved heroes — including just about everyone ever connected to N.W.A, save for CPO — with great frequency. The stage name, coined by his mother while he was an athletic youngster, is entirely fitting: verses are constructed with album titles, label heads are mentioned as if scholarly attention is paid to the industry’s inner workings. And yet, this is hardly another Guerilla Black, an MC lacking originality. The Game’s scope is obviously much wider, and he’s no mimic; though he’s still finding his feet as a lyricist, isn’t as distinct vocally as 50 or Lloyd Banks, and nearly allows the gimmicks to overwhelm the skills, The Documentary is an excellent debut that also hints at a lot of potential. Dr. Dre and an all-star cast of fellow producers are in top form, Just Blaze, Timbaland, Kanye West, and Hi-Tek included, and none of the features steal any thunder from the star. The most remarkable aspect of the Game is how he can be such a blatant product of gangsta rap (okay, let’s say fanboy) and leave a mark so fast. But, as he says in “Dreams,” “Anything is possible if 50 f*cked Vivica.” – Andy Kellman

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