|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

The '59 Sound

Rate It! Avg: 5.0 (2 ratings)
Retail
Member
The '59 Sound album cover
01
Great Expectations
3:05
$0.49
$0.99
02
The '59 Sound
3:09
$0.49
$0.99
03
Old White Lincoln
3:23
$0.49
$0.99
04
High Lonesome
3:05
$0.49
$0.99
05
Film Noir
3:29
$0.49
$0.99
06
Miles Davis & The Cool
4:11
$0.49
$0.99
07
The Patient Ferris Wheel
3:34
$0.49
$0.99
08
Casanova, Baby!
2:57
$0.49
$0.99
09
Even Cowgirls Get the Blues
3:30
$0.49
$0.99
10
Meet Me By the River's Edge
3:19
$0.49
$0.99
11
Here's Lookin At You, Kid
3:36
$0.49
$0.99
12
The Backseat
4:14
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 41:32

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

eMusic Features

0

Interview: The Gaslight Anthem

By Nick Marino, Contributor

Much has been made of The Gaslight Anthem's roots in New Jersey. The old-school bar-band rock sound, the working-class ethos, the unapologetic torch-bearing of a certain Asbury Park legend — it's all too much to ignore. But a few Garden State particulars aside, "New Jersey" really means "Americana." And for a band like Gaslight Anthem, Americana signifies the yearning sensibilities of kids all across the land, wired with energy and looking for an outlet. It's… more »

7

It Came From New Jersey

By Brian Raftery, Contributor

Click for Full-Sized Image In the 40 years since Bruce Springsteen signed his first record deal, the New Jersey native has established himself as the bard of the Garden State — a rep that continues with the release of Wrecking Ball, his 17th studio album. But the Boss isn't the only hungry-hearted Jersey musician who's managed to get on the map. Herewith, an annotated atlas of where a few home-state heroes got their start. Click the… more »

0

Six Degrees of Boston

By Jayson Greene, Senior Editor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Boston

By Jayson Greene, Senior Editor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

In 1988, Jon Bon Jovi was being interviewed by a reporter for Spin Magazine when he was asked if he was a fan of Bruce Springsteen. Bon Jovi replied “In New Jersey, if you don’t like Springsteen they raise your taxes.” Listening to the Gaslight Anthem’s second full-length album The ’59 Sound, it’s pretty clear that leader Brian Fallon doesn’t have to worry much about his tax bill in the Garden State. Hailing from New Brunswick, NJ, the Gaslight Anthem are that rare punk band that displays a strong and unmistakable Springsteen influence, and while Fallon’s vocal resemblance to the Boss is clearly coincidental (he has more than a bit of Bruce’s throaty gravity without the grit), the boys-and-girls-on-the-backstreets tone of his lyrics is not, especially when stray fragments from Springsteen’s lyrics pop up in Fallon’s songs (cue up “Meet Me by the River’s Edge” and “High Lonesome” for evidence). If Fallon often comes off as a youthful Springsteen wannabe on The ’59 Sound, he also happens to be pretty good at it; the force and sincerity of his songs roll over the occasional clunky spots, and the band brings this music across with a strength and urgency that suggests a heartland rock version of Social Distortion, with Alex Rosamila’s guitars and Benny Horowitz’s drumming brimming with fire and energy. The Gaslight Anthem are far too good to be the New Millennium’s answer to John Cafferty & the Beaver Brown Band, but it’s all but impossible to listen to The ’59 Sound without being aware of this band’s key influence; even if they never grow out of their Springsteen obsession, they’re worth hearing, but it’s hard not to hope they’ll develop a stronger identity of their own with time…though they may want to warn their tax accountant before that happens. – Mark Deming

more »