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First Frost

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First Frost album cover
01
The Town & the Hills
4:06
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02
Good Light
2:51
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03
A Sobering Thought (Just When One Was Needed)
4:54
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04
California in Popular Song
3:52
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05
South-East Coastal Rendezvous
3:50
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06
The National Mitten Registry
4:20
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07
Day Three of Five
3:18
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08
Never & Always
2:50
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09
Lament of the Chiming Wedgebill
3:49
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10
How We Met
5:15
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11
Song of the Undersea
3:28
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12
Up With the Sun
3:04
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13
Pines
4:56
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14
Who Turned On the Lights?
3:48
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 54:21

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Great final album

Areplacement

sweet touching indie pop from Australia.

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Last Licks

trilmachio1

If I had my way, these guys would continue to issue bouncy, poppy, endlessly listenable folk rock forever. As it is, this is their last album (they broke up in 2009). So there goes that. But it's a good album to end on, if there has to be an end. A fuller sound, but still unmistakably the Lucksmiths. Listen to "Never & Always".

eMusic Features

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They Say All Music Guide

The Lucksmiths have never released a record that was less than lovely. Since 1993 the Australian trio (now quartet) has been crafting thoughtful indie pop that warms both ears and hearts in equal measure. Filled with some of their best songs and most fully realized arrangements, 2005′s Warmer Corners marked a high point in the band’s career that would seem like a hard act to follow. Luckily, the band is up for the challenge on 2008′s First Frost, and if it falls a little short of Warmer Corners, the album is still top-shelf Lucksmiths. The full arrangements (horns, strings, and loads of backing vocals) are here; the songs are a mix of tender ballads, chugging rockers, and introspective midtempo rambles; and Tali White’s everyman vocals are as intimate and real as ever. This time out, the songwriting chores are split among the four members, with each of them focusing on tiny moments of heartbreak and spinning tales of poetic melancholy in a way that has become the band’s trademark. Marty Donald turns in some truly memorable songs, “California in Popular Song” and “How We Met” chief among them, while new guitarist Louis Richter happily proves himself able to meet the high standards the band has established with his two contributions, “The Town and the Hills” and “Never and Always.” Richter may also be responsible for the heavier guitar tones that appear throughout the album, giving tracks like “Up with the Sun” and “South-East Coastal Rendezvous” a jolt of rock energy. The female vocals (courtesy of Bee Rigby) on the country weeper “Lament of the Chiming Wedgebill” and the Hammond organ and cowbell (!) on “Who Turned Out the Lights?” also serve to expand the group’s sonic template. These slight changes and surprises are nice, but what counts in the end are the songs and the voice that sings them — both are in fine form, and First Frost is more of the Lucksmiths at their finest. – Tim Sendra

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