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Killingsworth

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (59 ratings)
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Killingsworth album cover
01
Dark Hand of Contagion
Artist: Minus 5
3:24
$0.69
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02
The Long Hall
Artist: Minus 5
3:04
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03
The Disembowlers
Artist: Minus 5
3:10
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04
The Luerking Barrister
Artist: Minus 5
3:05
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05
It Won't Do You Any Good
Artist: Minus 5
1:50
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06
Vintage Violet
Artist: Minus 5
2:40
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07
Scott Walker's Fault
Artist: Minus 5
3:08
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08
Big Beat Up Moon
Artist: Minus 5
3:11
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09
I Would Rather Sacrifice You
Artist: Minus 5
2:58
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10
Ambulance Dancehall
Artist: Minus 5
2:51
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11
Gash In The Cocoon
Artist: Minus 5
3:57
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12
Smoke On, Jerry
Artist: Minus 5
3:13
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13
Favorite Mess
Artist: Minus 5
2:18
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14
Tonight You're Buying Me A Drink, Bub
Artist: Minus 5
2:51
$0.69
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 41:40

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Wondering Sound

Review 1

Karen Schoemer

Contributor

Karen Schoemer hosts "The Schoemer Show" on WGXC 90.7 fm Hudson/Catskill and www.wgxc.org. She is the author of Great Pretenders: My Strange Love Affair with '5...more »

07.07.09
The Minus 5, Killingsworth
2009 | Label: Yep Roc Records / Redeye

On "Ambulance Dancehall," singer and songwriter Scott McCaughey finally goes too far. It's odd enough that the song opens as a fiddle-and-guitar country shuffle borrowed from Texas legend Doug Sahm via early-'90s alt-rockers Uncle Tupelo, then slides into a surreal tale about a Civil War-era hospital turned nightclub where the featured entertainment is a band called Florence and the Nightingales, and which a cult of "Christians and killers" sets ablaze. What's really deranged… read more »

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128 k

doctorbob

There are only 2 songs on this record above 128. A real sham(e). I'm sure the music will please fans of previous efforts but c'mon.

eMusic Features

0

The Minus 5's Scott McCaughey

By Philip Sherburne, Contributor

Scott McCaughey steadfastly refuses to take himself seriously, but that shouldn't stop the rest of us. Over the past 15 years, the goofball frontman of the Young Fresh Fellows has evolved behind the scenes into a pillar of big-league indie rock. In addition to his day job as a utility player for R.E.M., he's the bassist for Robyn Hitchcock's backing band the Venus 3, adding oomph and sparkle to Ole Taratula and Goodnight Oslo, two… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Scott McCaughey is a man who has worn plenty of musical hats over the years, but he has a funny way of bringing his own personality to whatever project he’s working on, even as his collaborators lend their distinct colors to the music. The eighth album from McCaughey’s the Minus 5 is a fine example; for Killingsworth, McCaughey and his usual musical partner, Peter Buck, are joined by several members of the Decemberists, and when McCaughey’s smart, slightly bent pop sensibilities meet Colin Meloy’s arty grand-scale folk-rock, you get a curious but thoroughly compelling country rock album that sounds casual and epochal at once. McCaughey has brought a more somber set of tunes to this project than one might expect, and while there’s an undercurrent of whimsy lurking in songs like “Vintage Violent,” “Smoke On, Jerry,” and “Scott Walker’s Fault,” the fiddles, steel guitar, and accordions that pepper the arrangements bring the sad side of these melodies to the surface, and the harmonies of the She Bee Gees walk a fine line between somber and playful. “Big Beat Up Moon” and “Dark Hand of Contagion” are sad songs that speak to a world full of sad people, while “It Won’t Do You Any Good” and “The Long Hall” hold out little that things will improve anytime soon, but McCaughey’s songs speak of a messed-up planet where we’re all in it together, and that with a little compassion (and some cold beer), we can help carry one another’s burdens. Killingsworth is an album a bit short on optimism, but there’s a cock-eyed hope in the sweet sadness of this music, and for a guy who used to make like the class clown of the Pacific Northwest, Scott McCaughey shows again he’s matured into one of the strongest and most distinctive songwriters of his generation. These 14 songs conjure up a musical vision that’s very much his own, despite the A-list help backing him up. – Mark Deming

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