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For All Mankind

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (23 ratings)
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For All Mankind album cover
01
All Go for Launch
1:26
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02
Man Alone
3:05
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03
Cyborg
2:47
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04
Make a Circuit with Me
2:28
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05
Navitron
2:22
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06
The Tale of Europa
3:10
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07
Heroes
2:23
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08
She'll Launch
3:01
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09
Infinite Frontier
3:27
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10
Compensation
2:45
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11
Don't Overheat on Me
2:36
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12
Into a Time Warp
2:45
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13
Science and Honor
3:38
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14
The Colvin Moon
4:01
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 39:54

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great band!!!

lillingtons101

5 stars. This album rocks!!! My favorite album of 2008. Also check this band out live. One of my favorite live bands.

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Worth a Look

MarcoD

Normally someone who likes straight forward punk I was a little turned off by the image of these guys at first. If you're a fan of the Aquabats, Devo, Oingo Boingo or the likes check these guys out. If you're not, at least check out their cover of the Polecats "Make a Circuit" worth a download even if you don't like the previously mentioned.

They Say All Music Guide

The Phenomenauts sound like a perfect fusion of the new wave revival of the early 2000s (poppy-punky synth rock bands like the Epoxies and Controller.Controller) and the tongue in cheek, futuristic surf rock of ’90s indie heroes Man or Astro-man?. Third album For All Mankind is jam-packed with all manner of synth-pop, retro-rockabilly, and post-punk tropes — including, brilliantly, a cover of a genuine new wave chestnut, the Polecats’ entirely appropriate 1982 synthabilly hit “Make a Circuit with Me” — mixed with a campily geeky sci-fi persona that presents the Oakland-based quintet in goofy outfits silly enough to get them laughed out of the nearest comic book convention and singing lyrics equally inspired by Isaac Asimov and the Sci-Fi Channel’s movie of the week. One probably needs a working knowledge of the subculture to get all of the jokes, but the neat thing about For All Mankind is that it isn’t just jokes: opening track “Man Alone” is built on a chorus of “All of us, we should have a mission/We should have a purpose,” a dead serious statement of inclusion and social connectivity. Of course, that’s immediately followed by “Cyborg,” a country-style ballad about a guy whose attempt to manufacture the perfect girlfriend ends in tears, so there’s a number of giggles to be had as well. A must for the new wave and/or Battlestar Galactica fans on your Christmas list, For All Mankind is light, frothy fun with just enough musical and lyrical substance to keep it from being brainlessly corny. – Stewart Mason

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