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Practice What You Preach

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (44 ratings)
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Practice What You Preach album cover
01
More Mess On My Thing
4:12
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02
Upper Class
3:40
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03
Funky Runthrough Pt. 1 & 2
4:37
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04
What You Doin'
3:35
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05
North Carolina
2:51
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06
Practice What You Preach
3:27
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07
Strokin' The Grits
4:15
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08
It Came Over Me
3:28
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09
The Plan
3:06
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10
Choking On A Piece Of Meat
2:26
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11
Saltin' The Soup
4:10
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 39:47

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Soulful and Funky

Televiper

A good compliment to the Lee Fields, and Sharon Jones releases on Daptone. Has the late 60's James Brown'isms but also a bit of the Stax sound.

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Not As Good As I Hoped

funkyes

After their debut album, Discern/Define, I expected more from this release. Veers away from the cool hip-funk they played on the last album, and has a more southern-funk influence. Check out The Bamboos and the Budos Band to hear where funk is really at.

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Very Funky

Namahage

Good solid funk. No regrets on checking this one out.

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Perfect

TheCommish

Easily one of the most perfect funk LPs made in the last 20 years. A tremendous reissue, done with the blessing of the band, released on Daptone.

They Say All Music Guide

Practice What You Preach is a solid 11 cuts of hard-hitting, greasy soul-funk that takes its cues straight from the greats (the JB’s, the Meters, etc.). The compositions are catchy, if admittedly derivative, and enjoyably varied, spanning all-out party-starting burners (“Funky Runthrough,” the title tune), simmering midtempo groovers (all with food-related titles), and a couple of decently convincing soul ballads. The grooves are deep in the pocket, and the musicianship is basically impeccable. But what makes the record especially notable is its provenance: Munich in 1993 (or any other year for that matter) was hardly a hotbed of Afro-American-derived groovesmanship. Germans aren’t exactly noted for their funkiness, but they are known for a punctilious work ethic, which might explain the care that clearly went into this album’s meticulously accurate period vibe, right down to the recording and mixing. Unlikely as it must have seemed to them at the time, the Poets of Rhythm can now be seen as the forefathers of the 2000s soul-funk revival, so it’s fitting that this, their debut album, has been reissued by Daptone Records, the standard-bearers for faithfully authentic retro-soul. Collectors should take note, however, that all of these tracks, in a different sequence but with the addition of two non-album 45s, are still readily available on the Shadow Records compilation What Goes ‘Round. – K. Ross Hoffman

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