|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

10,000 Shots

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (24 ratings)
Retail
Member
10,000 Shots album cover
01
Smokin' Bowl
3:05
$0.49
$0.99
02
Best Day Until Tomorrow
2:46
$0.49
$0.99
03
Will Ye No Come Back Again?
1:59
$0.49
$0.99
04
Pour Decisions
2:36
$0.49
$0.99
05
I Hate My Band
2:16
$0.49
$0.99
06
Farewell To Nova Scotia
2:09
$0.49
$0.99
07
Bugger Off
2:02
$0.49
$0.99
08
10,000 Shots
2:20
$0.49
$0.99
09
13
2:38
$0.49
$0.99
10
The Skeleton and The Tailor
2:03
$0.49
$0.99
11
Comin' Thro' The Rye
1:38
$0.49
$0.99
12
The Ale Is Dear
1:22
$0.49
$0.99
13
The Catalpa
3:03
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 29:57

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

They Say All Music Guide

Evidently, Fat Mike’s a pretty big fan of the Real McKenzies. He signed them to Fat Wreck for 2005′s 10,000 Shots, and even played bass for most of the album under the alias “Fat McMichael.” Other than their shifting lineup, though, the McKenzies remain largely unchanged from the sound of past records like Oot & Aboot or Loch’d & Loaded. Shots is full of revved-up Scottish traditionals and revivalist punk originals, and the endearingly gruff Paul McKenzie leads the way. The rousing “Pour Decision” puts bagpipes over Social Distortion rhythm guitar, and Mike Ness would certainly be happy with McKenzie’s sentiment. “A punk musician just ain’t as cute at 53,” he sings. “I have forsaken money makin’/Yeah, you still wish you were me.” It’s this self-deprecating pride that separates the McKenzies from similarly hybridist groups like Dropkick Murphys or Flogging Molly. They’re looser, more ragged, maybe a little less reverent. It’s not that McKenzie is less proud of his Scottish Canadian heritage, or less committed to old favorites like “Farewell to Nova Scotia” or songs set to the words of legendary Scottish bard Robert Burns. But like Fat Mike and NOFX, there’s a rambling, rapid-fire sense of humor to the Real McKenzies’ work, heard here in “Bugger Off,” say, or the good-natured slag “I Hate My Band” (“They’ve cost me my dog, my job and my wife!”). Matt MacNasty’s bagpipe is particularly impressive over the melodic hardcore stutter of “Skeleton and the Tailor,” and “Catalpa” is acoustic with impressive harmony vocals and mandolin leads, while the punchy, triumphant “Best Day Until Tomorrow” dispenses some advice any grandmother from the old country would heartily endorse. “Enjoy what’chas got, not what you have not.” – Johnny Loftus

more »