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Fuckin A

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (177 ratings)
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Fuckin A album cover
01
Our Trip
1:57
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02
Every Stitch
2:05
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03
How We Know
3:20
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04
When You're Thrown
1:45
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05
Remember Today
2:55
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06
A Stare Like Yours
2:49
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07
Let Your Earth Quake, Baby
2:24
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08
God and Country
2:18
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09
End to Begin
2:50
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10
Forward
2:14
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11
Keep Time
2:48
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12
Top of the Earth
1:00
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 28:25

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 1

Douglas Wolk

Contributor

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

03.15.10
The Thermals, Fuckin A
Label: Sub Pop Records

Anyone who thinks four-chord punk rock is played out is directed to this 2004 cluster-bomb of an album, on which Portland, Oregon's finest demonstrate that punk can be very simple, very angry, very smart, and incredibly fresh. The Thermals' songs often sound like they're streamlined versions of something much more complicated, played with their fuzzboxes and tempos cranked up all the way. Singer/guitarist Hutch Harris's rat-a-tat four- and five-syllable lines build from the sounds of… read more »

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Vital

happiergoat

The formal elements are obvious. The hooks are there. The voice grated on me at first as attention-grabbing. But this is full-bodied, very intentional and intelligent pop punk rock.

user avatar

This sh*t just rocks

alexashton

Loud, in your face, catchy and meaningful punk rock, plain and simple.

eMusic Features

0

Who Are…Male Bonding

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

The shortest song on Male Bonding's full-length debut, Nothing Hurts, is a frantic 89 seconds long; the longest is still comfortably under the three-minute barrier. Formed by three former record-store co-workers, they're way too caffeinated and enthusiastic to bother with anything that doesn't get straight to the point, and their songs sprint noisily from hook to hook to finish line. As you might expect, they're hardcore music geeks — they run a label in their… more »

They Say All Music Guide

With a title that’s as much a call to arms as a call to rock out, the Thermals’ Fuckin A offers a darker, more developed version of the passionate, in-the-red indie rock of their debut, More Parts Per Million. The most immediately noticeable difference between the two albums is the sound quality: instead of recording most of the songs to a cassette player in Hutch Harris’ kitchen, as the band did with their first album, this time the Thermals spent four days in a more traditional studio with friend/producer/Death Cab for Cutie guitarist/organist Chris Walla. The result is an album that sounds cleaner but still keeps most of the band’s ramshackle energy. However, the Thermals have different reasons to sound urgent on Fuckin A than they did on More Parts Per Million; though that album’s “No Culture Icons” tackled the politics of the indie scene, much of Fuckin A is just straight-up political, a response to the war in Iraq and other events in America and in the world that transpired after their debut was released. The switch to a moderately cleaner sound for this album pays off well in this regard, if only because it’s easier to hear Harris’ smart, talky lyrics with a few layers of static stripped from them. On songs like “End to Begin,” “When You’re Thrown,” and “God and Country” — on which he sneers, “Pray for a new state, pray for assassination” — Harris balances the power of protest chants with the same intricate wordplay and internal rhymes that made it worth dividing his lyrics from More Parts Per Million’s wash of noise. Even the songs that aren’t overtly political still have political leanings: on “A Stare Like Yours,” described by Harris as an “aggressive love song,” he sings, “When you don’t have control, you have to pretend.” Likewise, “Forward” and “Remember Today” have a bouncy idealism that stands in sharp contrast to Fuckin A’s more charged moments. “Keep Time,” one of the best songs the Thermals have yet written, is both upbeat and political, an anthem about trying to keep some hope even in challenging times. Owing to its themes, Fuckin A is a shade or two less exuberant than More Parts Per Million, but it’s no less passionate or energetic, and it proves the Thermals can introduce new sounds and ideas into their music without losing what made them worth listening to in the first place. – Heather Phares

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