|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Squeeze - Remastered

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (2 ratings)
Retail
Member
Squeeze - Remastered album cover
01
Little Jack
3:27
$0.49
$0.99
02
Crash
1:23
$0.49
$0.99
03
Caroline
2:35
$0.49
$0.99
04
Mean Old Man
2:53
$0.49
$0.99
05
Dopey Joe
3:09
$0.49
$0.99
06
Wordless
3:03
$0.49
$0.99
07
She'll Make You Cry
2:46
$0.49
$0.99
08
Friends
2:40
$0.49
$0.99
09
Send No Letter
3:13
$0.49
$0.99
10
Jack & Jane
2:57
$0.49
$0.99
11
Louise
5:45
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 33:51

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

eMusic Features

0

Who Are…Light Heat

By Matthew Fritch, Contributor

Quentin Stoltzfus shot through the ranks of a late '90s Philadelphia psych-rock scene — a tightly-knit faction of retro-futurists that included the Lilys, Bardo Pond, Lenola, Photon Band, Azusa Plane and Asteroid #4 — on the back of a near-perfect dream-pop debut album. Watch It Happen, released under the name Mazarin, revealed Stoltzfus's talent for princely, soft-focus pop that was well aligned with peers such as Grandaddy and the Elephant 6 collective. Two more Mazarin… more »

2

36 Songs To Soothe the Pain

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

Whether you're happily married or told Cupid to shove it a long time ago, we can all agree on one thing: to quote the one-and-only Nazareth, "Love hurts/ Love scars/ Love wounds/ And mars." Or something. That's why we went ahead and compiled a list of 36 Songs To Soothe the Pain, from the bloodletting confessionals of Neko Case, Bright Eyes and Sunny Day Real Estate to the melancholic melodies of Sigur Rós, the Shangri-Las… more »

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Brian Eno’s Another Green World

By Richard Gehr, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Brian Eno’s Another Green World

By Richard Gehr, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Icon: Lou Reed

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

Lou Reed wasn't the type of star that most rock fans had even considered might die. That doesn't mean he was indestructible, or even invulnerable. Hell, in 1973, he placed second to Keith Richards in a music-biz insider's straw poll of the rock star most likely to die soon. That Reed kept on — as ornery as ever, as fully himself, whatever you thought of the work itself — is remarkable unto itself. The fact… more »

1

Icon: Lou Reed

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

Lou Reed wasn't the type of star that most rock fans had even considered might die. That doesn't mean he was indestructible, or even invulnerable. Hell, in 1973, he placed second to Keith Richards in a music-biz insider's straw poll of the rock star most likely to die soon. That Reed kept on — as ornery as ever, as fully himself, whatever you thought of the work itself — is remarkable unto itself. The fact… more »