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The Velvet Underground & Nico 45th Anniversary

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The Velvet Underground & Nico 45th Anniversary album cover
01
Sunday Morning
2:56
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02
I'm Waiting For The Man
4:40
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03
Femme Fatale
2:39
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04
Venus In Furs
5:12
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05
Run Run Run
4:22
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06
All Tomorrow's Parties
6:00
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07
Heroin
7:14
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08
There She Goes Again
2:41
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09
I'll Be Your Mirror
2:14
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10
Black Angel's Death Song
3:12
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11
European Son
7:48
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 48:58

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Wondering Sound

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Ira Robbins

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Ira Robbins co-founded Trouser Press magazine in 1974. (Think of it as a pre-Internet music blog). He was later pop music editor at Newsday and has written for

11.01.13
One of early rock's most feral releases
2012 | Label: Polydor

The Velvet Underground and Nico, released months before Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club in 1967, is no concept album, but it is the distinct product of multiple creative forces pulling in different directions and boasts every bit as much diversity, complexity and ambition. End of similarity. Rather than politely challenge the summer-of-lovers with charming new musical ideas, the Velvets here treat rock almost as an afterthought to a shameless freedom learned from decadent 19th Century… read more »

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