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The Viceroys Inna De Yard

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01
Heart Made Of Stone
3:35
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02
Ya Ho
4:35
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03
My Mission Is Impossible
5:39
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04
I Guarantee My Love
4:23
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05
So Many Problems
3:40
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06
Love Jah
4:41
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07
Last Night
5:30
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08
Slogan On The Wall
9:04
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09
Shadrach, Meshach, And Abendigo
5:32
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10
Rise In The Strength Of Jah
2:23
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 49:02

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They Say All Music Guide

The Viceroys dawdle Inna de Yard, revisiting their past with delight, on this stellar set that doubles as a succinct greatest-hits collection. Like many of Jamaica’s greatest groups, the Viceroys began their career at Studio One, but only bloomed upon leaving the label. They matured quickly under the aegis of producers Lloyd Daley, Derrick Morgan, and Winston Riley, finally returning to Dodd’s side in the late ’70s a far better band than had left. Many of the songs within were drawn from this second stint with Coxsone Dodd. Moving on, the Viceroys next linked up with Phil Pratt, with a recut of their 1968 Studio One hit “Ya Ho” entitling the album they cut for him. “Heart Made of Stone” represents their time with the Taxi Gang, while
“Rising the Strength of Jah” and “Mission Impossible” denote their relationship with Linval Thompson. Incidentally, the latter song was originally cut for Riley back in 1975 under the title “Nothing Is Impossible.” In any case, bar “Ya Ho,” these new versions convey only passing resemblance to the originals or their remodels, as producer/guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith strips the songs back to their bare beauty. Even with the inclusion of keyboards, the arrangements feel minimalistic. At times, the atmosphere is light-hearted or even tongue-in-cheek, like “Mission Impossible,” which incorporates the theme from the TV show. In contrast, “So Many Problems”‘s aura is almost brutal, “Slogan on the Wall” conjures up the dreadest of moods, while “Stone” bristles with militancy. The show-stopping “Rising” is performed virtually a cappella, accompanied only by sharp reggae guitar, its strength bubbling up from the singers themselves. The Viceroys as you’ve never heard them, their songs as you’ve never envisioned, wrapped in a simplicity that brings forth their true power and glory. Add the live DVD footage, and this set is one to be treasured by every reggae fan. – Jo-Ann Greene

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