|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Alone In San Francisco

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (145 ratings)

We’re sorry. This album is unavailable for download in your country (United States) at this time.

Alone In San Francisco album cover
01
Blue Monk
3:48  
02
Ruby, My Dear
4:00  
03
Round Lights
3:37  
04
Everything Happens to Me
5:40  
05
You Took the Words Right Out of My Heart
4:05  
06
Bluehawk
3:40  
07
Pannonica
3:54  
08
Remember
2:44  
09
There's Danger in Your Eyes, Cherie - take 2
4:22  
10
There's Danger in Your Eyes, Cherie - take 1
4:08  
11
Reflections
5:06  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK // LIVE

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 45:04

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 4 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

more from a master

Roygbiv

wow! uniquely Monk

user avatar

Classic solo Monk!

griffsticks

Relaxed session, beautifully recorded; Monk seems inspired! A wonderful spirit pervades the entire recording! Highly recommended!

user avatar

killing record...

badperson

I can never get tired of monk and seem to learn something every time I hear him. this mix of originals and standards is a nice contrast, and his approach to playing solo is so personal...a great side.

user avatar

wow...

joshpar

.... simply ... wow...

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

House Party Starting: Playing Herbie Nichols

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Ask a jazz fan about Herbie Nichols, and the reaction is likely to be either, "He's a genius," or "Who?" The pianist and composer is the paradigm of a genius neglected in his own time. Nichols's classic mid-'50s sides for Blue Note were all but forgotten when he passed at 44 in 1963. A.B. Spellman memorialized him with a chapter in 1966's Four Lives in the Be-Bop Business, but he didn't get much respect till… more »

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »

0

The Not Necessarily Happy Horns of Clark Terry

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Can a musician's reputation be harmed by the persistent paying of a compliment? Clark Terry has a warm, plump, utterly distinctive sound on trumpet and its chubby pal the flugelhorn. He's rhythmically assured at any tempo, and has a deep feeling for the blues. But some writers fixate on how he has "the happiest sound in jazz," as if one trait defines his art. To be fair, it's not a rep he's run away from, having… more »

They Say All Music Guide

With the robust ambience of Fugazi Hall in San Francisco at his disposal, Thelonious Monk recorded ten unaccompanied tracks over two days to create a long-awaited sequel to his immensely endearing Thelonious Himself long-player. As had become somewhat customary for Monk, he brought with him a healthy sampling from his voluminous back catalog, cover tunes, as well as a few new compositions. What is most immediately striking about these recordings is the rich and accurate sound stage at Fugazi Hall. The overtones are rich and thoughtful in their ability to animate Monk’s recreations of some of his most endearing works, such as the pair that opens this set. “Blue Monk” still retains the proud stride and walking blues heritage of previous renderings. Adding a bit of off-tempo improvisation, Monk propels and emphasizes the rhythmic swing even harder. He is obviously also enjoying what he is hearing. The audible maturity guiding Monk through the familiar, albeit offbeat, chord progressions of “Ruby, My Dear” is striking. His nimble reflexes and split-second timing render this version superior. Again, the sound of the hall offers even more to enjoy from this performance. It is unfortunate that the playful solitude of “Round Lights” was never revisited. This freeform composition is framed within a blues structure, yet reveals all of the slightly askew freedom of a Monk original. The recreation of an old 1920s hit, “There’s Danger in Your Eyes, Cherie,” is another of the highlights from Thelonious Alone in San Francisco that was never recorded again by Monk. The noir qualities are immeasurably enhanced by Monk’s oblique phrasings as well as the eerie resonance of the Fugazi. Both the CD reissue and the mammoth Complete Riverside Recordings box set luckily include two unique passes of the track. This is an absolute must-own recording — Monk enthusiast or not. – Lindsay Planer

more »