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Live at the 1964 Monterey Jazz Festival

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (23 ratings)

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Live at the 1964 Monterey Jazz Festival album cover
01
Blue Monk
10:39  
02
Evidence
10:04  
03
Bright Mississippi
9:36  
04
Rhythm-A-Ning
8:43  
05
Think of One
9:00  
06
Straight, No Chaser
11:03  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK // LIVE

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 59:05

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user avatar

Not for audiophiles, for music lovers

mr. mark

Much of the old and new music on here is not perfect sounding--the MP3 format compression limits the sound somewhat (not tech inclined, but this is a simple explanation.)And yes, some modern producers do fiddle with classic music--EQ, remixing, fake stereo, etc. E-music is a great way to explore some great music in decent quality sound. It is what it is...this sounds fine to me, great music! The e music downloads sound the same as music downloaded from Apple's i-tunes or from Amazon.com. If you like jazz and blues this is the place.

user avatar

Good performance, OK sound

MarkSullivan

The allmusic review is right: not essential, but interesting. The MJF website says there has been some deterioration of their tape archive, so that may explain the occasional slight distortion. I don't think these recordings were originally intended for commercial release, either, so engineering might have been casual. It wasn't enough to bother me, but it is noticeable.

user avatar

Don't blame the year

Caponsacchi

If pre-70s recordings were lacking in audio quality, so much for Duke, Billie, Pops, Bird, Coltrane and Monk, who all made their statements then. But in my experience the live recordings made in the mid-1950s are actually better than the ones I'm hearing today. The audio problems are due to compression, effects, EQ tweaking, and all the later fooling around with the original source. If I want to hear a true acoustic bass sound, I go back to my LPs pre-1960.

user avatar

Take it for what it is

bjs001001

The lack of audio quality can also be due to sourse limitations. You have to keep in mind that pre-70's recordings (especialy live ones)tend to lack in quality high notes and low bass notes. If you like Monk though, the music is right on.

user avatar

not impressed with audio quality

meyers66

I'm not impressed with the high notes on the track Blue Monk. There is some distortion. Could be better. Why not a higher bit rate?

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

House Party Starting: Playing Herbie Nichols

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Ask a jazz fan about Herbie Nichols, and the reaction is likely to be either, "He's a genius," or "Who?" The pianist and composer is the paradigm of a genius neglected in his own time. Nichols's classic mid-'50s sides for Blue Note were all but forgotten when he passed at 44 in 1963. A.B. Spellman memorialized him with a chapter in 1966's Four Lives in the Be-Bop Business, but he didn't get much respect till… more »

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »

0

The Not Necessarily Happy Horns of Clark Terry

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Can a musician's reputation be harmed by the persistent paying of a compliment? Clark Terry has a warm, plump, utterly distinctive sound on trumpet and its chubby pal the flugelhorn. He's rhythmically assured at any tempo, and has a deep feeling for the blues. But some writers fixate on how he has "the happiest sound in jazz," as if one trait defines his art. To be fair, it's not a rep he's run away from, having… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Thelonious Monk played at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1963 and created a buzz so strong he was invited back the following year. His one-hour set from 1964 is available here, featuring his quartet through the first forty minutes. Tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse and drummer Ben Riley are joined by Steve Swallow on upright acoustic bass loaned from the Art Farmer group, whom he performed with at the event. Having studied Monk’s music and played it with Steve Lacy, Swallow was ready to jump into the fray for his first-ever performance with Monk, having not even spoken with the pianist up to show time. He sounds very comfortable, swinging effortlessly, playing mostly quarter notes throughout the concert, but rarely straying off the path. These are typical Monk originals for the time period, and are solidly showcased, with Rouse doing the soloing, Monk traditionally comping, then laying out. Everything is ten-minutes long, portioned out between head, bridge and tail. “Rhythm-A-Ning” is taken at a bit quicker pace than usual, with Monk doing the urging on Rouse’s solo, while Swallow and Riley are noticeably more locked in during the “Sweet Georgia Brown” variation “Bright Mississippi.” The sound quality is a bit thin, and occasional distorted peaks are heard in the piano and tenor when they get too loud. The final two selections expand to a nonet directed by California icon Buddy Collette. His complementary horn charts are warm and effusive like gentle ocean waves at night, not challenging or pushy. Trumpeter Bobby Bryant’s gets two solos, one quite brash and lengthy, and Collette’s alto saxophone is also heard briefly in front of the band. Occasionally the horns drift breezily behind solos, and during the finale, “Straight, No Chaser,” they punctuate and provocate in clipped phrases. Coming out of the melody they are noticeably slightly out of sync with Rouse. This is an intriguing document, by no means essential, but a unique aside of the many live recordings Monk would do during this historic year in his latter period career. – Michael G. Nastos

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