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Deceit

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (143 ratings)
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Deceit album cover
01
Sleep
2:14
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02
Paper Hats
6:02
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03
Triumph
2:55
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04
S.P.Q.R.
3:28
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05
Cenotaph
4:39
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06
Shrink Wrap
1:40
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07
Radio Prague
2:21
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08
Makeshift Swahili
4:04
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09
Independence
3:42
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10
A New Kind of Water
4:57
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11
Hi Baku Shyo
4:03
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 40:05

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Douglas Wolk

Contributor

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

04.22.11
This Heat, Deceit
2006 | Label: RER USA / The Orchard

There are bands who think about what they're doing, there are bands who think a lot about what they're doing and then there's This Heat. Drummer, keyboardist and singer Charles Hayward has described how, when they were planning out their second album, Deceit, the trio's daily "rehearsals" consisted at one point of discussing how each song should work — for six weeks straight, during which they didn't play a note.

What they came up with… read more »

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user avatar

A masterpiece

pantagruel

Certainly deserves to be a 'pick' ahead of their first album. This is a completely unnerving record. Other bands have a 'scene', This Heat has a half-life. It will still sound as potent and polluting in a thousand years.

user avatar

So ahead of their time...

so-on

that they are ahead of ours. No one will ever do what this band did. They made magic, more political than a hundred punk bands, more innovative than anything that has yet to be thought of, and completely soulful. The bass line on "a new kind of water" gives me goosebumps and are those kazoos on "triumph"? they don't make music better than this.

user avatar

terrifying

jackwolfe

the least comforting record i own.

user avatar

a monster

Nonsensor

much more singing on this album than the first, and more recognizable song structures. but it's not "regular" music. from minute one of "Sleep," you know they mean business. One part post-punk, one part totally experimental, one part RIO/avant-prog, still nothing out there sounds like Deceit. It's exciting, it's scary, it never ever gets old.

user avatar

Moans to own

Menopeningumbrellasahead

I first heard This Heat on the John Peel programme when they recorded a session for him. Especially memorable were "Not Waving but Drowning" and "Fall of Saigon." It was a number of years later that I found their two albums "This Heat" and "Deceit" in a record shop and bought them both. The music will appeal to people who like Faust, C Cat Trance and other groups like this because although it is melodic, it is also heavily rhythmical and with droning vocals. Personally I love it. The group eventually became the Camberwell Now who are also well worth a listen.

user avatar

Moans to own

Menopeningumbrellasahead

I first heard This Heat on the John Peel programme when they recorded a session for him. Especially memorable were "Not Waving but Drowning" and "Fall of Saigon." It was a number of years later that I found their two albums "This Heat" and "Deceit" in a record shop and bought them both. The music will appeal to people who like Faust, C Cat Trance and other groups like this because although it is melodic, it is also heavily rhythmical and with droning vocals. Personally I love it. The group eventually became the Camberwell Now who are also well worth a listen.

user avatar

Moans to own

Menopeningumbrellasahead

I first heard This Heat on the John Peel programme when they recorded a session for him. Especially memorable were "Not Waving but Drowning" and "Fall of Saigon." It was a number of years later that I found their two albums "This Heat" and "Deceit" in a record shop and bought them both. The music will appeal to people who like Faust, C Cat Trance and other groups like this because although it is melodic, it is also heavily rhythmical and with droning vocals. Personally I love it. The group eventually became the Camberwell Now who are also well worth a listen.

user avatar

Moans to own

Menopeningumbrellasahead

I first heard This Heat on the John Peel programme when they recorded a session for him. Especially memorable were "Not Waving but Drowning" and "Fall of Saigon." It was a number of years later that I found their two albums "This Heat" and "Deceit" in a record shop and bought them both. The music will appeal to people who like Faust, C Cat Trance and other groups like this because although it is melodic, it is also heavily rhythmical and with droning vocals. Personally I love it. The group eventually became the Camberwell Now who are also well worth a listen.

user avatar

Moans to own

Menopeningumbrellasahead

I first heard This Heat on the John Peel programme when they recorded a session for him. Especially memorable were "Not Waving but Drowning" and "Fall of Saigon." It was a number of years later that I found their two albums "This Heat" and "Deceit" in a record shop and bought them both. The music will appeal to people who like Faust, C Cat Trance and other groups like this because although it is melodic, it is also heavily rhythmical and with droning vocals. Personally I love it. The group eventually became the Camberwell Now who are also well worth a listen.

user avatar

ANNOYING and bad

SCREAMINGSQUID

try getting a little sense of melody into your songs, tedious to listen to

They Say All Music Guide

Out of all the boundary breaking that occurred during the fertile era of post-punk, This Heat’s Deceit is one of the most expansive, imaginative, and remarkably wild records to have been produced during the time — and very possibly the last three decades. It’s an impressive procession of tangential shards that encompass tape collages, Middle Eastern motifs, barbaric vocal clamoring, and occasional pointy-jagged-atonal guitar passages that alternate between hypnotizing and shooting clean through your spine. The typical structures of jazz, world music, and rock & roll are heaved into a blender, cooking up a post-punk paella that’s about as relaxing as a crosstown walk through a hail storm. It ends up hardly resembling anything it takes cues from. As with a good number of the album’s ten tracks, random peeks into “Paper Hats” at the minute markers will hardly sound like the same song. And that song hardly resembles any of the others on the record; yet, it encapsulates what makes the whole thing so exciting. The song in question trots along arrhythmically with some bass, drum, and spindly guitar interplay until sputtering into a wreck of those instruments and who knows what else — this 20-second interruption, which resembles the Junkyard Gang’s idea of warming up, abruptly gives way to a march down a Twilight Zone-themed corridor of snaky guitar, pulsing high hats, and creeped-out atmospherics. If you can make out any of the lyrics (the ones in “Independence” should ring a bell, though), you’ll realize the mushroom clouds and political figures depicted in the sleeve aren’t the only evidence that the record is about war and nukes. Know this — if you really want to be thrown around a room, there’s hardly a better source. No greater record has been made in an abandoned meat locker. – Andy Kellman

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