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Ammunition

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (63 ratings)

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Ammunition album cover
01
Black Dog
4:10
$0.49
02
Oh People
3:38
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03
Next to You
4:19
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04
Not Today
3:12
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05
Back to the Pain
3:52
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06
I Wish You Well
3:23
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07
Before the Revolution
2:42
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08
News Blackout
3:12
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09
Dear Old Song & Dance
2:08
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10
J.P.M.F.y.F.
4:07
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11
C-Dub
2:24
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12
I Don't Want to Come Home
5:03
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13
Sitting on Top of the World
2:56
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14
Baltimore
2:56
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15
Dear Old Song & Dance (Alternate Version)
2:08
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 50:10

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Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

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Great introduction to stunning lyrist and singer

Greenjen

This is a great introduction to Tim. The album is more acoustic than the previous ones and the most recent, Porcupine. I've listened to it many times and every song is strong. Try this Tim and then delve into older/newer ones.

user avatar

Wonderful

belakoe

Excellent record about change, get it you won't be dissapointed.

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Top 5

CreamJalapeno

Still one of the best albums I've downloaded from emusic. Highly recommend it.

user avatar

Solid effort

blakey23

Although I'm a fan of this genre I have never been particularly fond of Tim's output. I decided to give this one a shot given the great reviews as well as the fact that the Jayhawks were involved in the record. The songwriting is good and although fairly sparse the arrangements are excellent. Tim's voice brings the emotion out of his lyrics and provides a very raw and intimate feeling to the record. Give this one a shot, you won't be disapointed.

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Best Heard in 2007

CAMEL

The first time I ever heard of Tim Easton was when I heard him open for The Jayhawks. I now own all of his stuff, but the other albums don't represent the live sound of Tim Easton and this album does. This is a must listen and I don't know why all music gave it such a weak review, in comparison to his other albums I feel it is the best and a must have!!!!!!

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Fantastico

glennleboner

I love this cd because it seems so saw. I feel like tim is sitting behing me playing these songs in my room. This cd also makes many political references that are very relevant in todays world. If your only going to check out a few make it "next to me", "o People", and "Dear old song and dance"

They Say All Music Guide

For his first release in over three years, and his third for the New West label, singer/songwriter Tim Easton goes even further back to his roots. An album made on the road, its 13 songs were recorded in six studios in six different states. Still, it maintains a distinctive thread provided by Easton’s unplugged, unvarnished approach and smooth yet earthy vocals. Various members of the Jayhawks contribute, but like Tift Merritt, whose barely-there backing vocals on the lovely “Next to You” don’t add much personality, they only bring muted accompaniment to what is very much a solo project. Only Lucinda Williams’ trademarked whisky-soured harmonies on “Back to the Pain” convey another distinctive voice to the mix. Easton sticks primarily to emotional ballads, with even his own strumming guitar and occasional percussion relegated to the background as he sings primarily of alienation and lost or waning love. The album’s generally dark, somber lyrics mesh well with his doe-eyed sleepy voice and the laconic tempo of the songs. “C-Dub” and “News Blackout” return him to Bringing It All Back Home-era Bob Dylan with prominent harmonica and political lyrics on the latter that creep into the personal as he closes the song with “Sweetheart, please, please take my hand.” There is a lonely, solemn quality to the unaccompanied “J.P.M.F.Y.F.” (short for “Jesus Protect Me from Your Followers”) that sounds like Easton strumming in his bedroom as he quietly lashes out at those who are “spitting in the face of love with one hand on the Bible and the other in the purse.” The closing cover of the blues standard “Sitting on Top of the World” brings the disc to a resigned and tranquil conclusion. Easton shoots his bullets with a silencer on the scraggly, moving, and introspective Ammunition, a personal album that takes a few spins, or more, to appreciate. – Hal Horowitz

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