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Never Is Forever

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Never Is Forever album cover
01
Letter From Your Momma
2:17
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02
Suburban Prince's Death Song
3:37
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03
Übermensch
3:38
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04
I Will Never Die
3:55
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05
No Beast So Fierce
3:55
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06
Destination: Hell
3:23
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07
Timebomb
3:18
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08
Pain In Der Arsch Pocket Full Of Cash
1:32
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09
Hush, Earthling
3:14
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10
Nihil Sleighride
3:00
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11
(He's A) Grunge Whore
4:37
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12
Black Chrome
2:27
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13
Oslo Bloodbath Pt. III: The Ballad Of Gerda And Tore
2:45
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14
Hush Earthling (Alt. Mix) (Bonus Track)
3:19
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15
Kick It Out (Bonus Track)
2:24
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16
Let It Burn (Bonus Track)
2:14
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 49:35

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They Say All Music Guide

In the space of less than a decade, which included only one American tour and four proper studio albums, Turbonegro’s contributions and accomplishments cannot be sullied by their untimely departure. In fact, from the arc of this band’s career development — following from the noise rock debut of Hot Cars through the glorious, razor-sharp glitter doom of Apocalypse Dudes — it’s evident that Turbonegro indeed had the material and the will to continuously develop and expand their sound. Never Is Forever is a searching rock disc recorded and issued initially in 1994. Though not as punishing, loud, or clearly directed as the follow-up, Ass Cobra, it is nonetheless a powerful document, even if Turbonegro is clearly still searching for their ultimate voice. To that end, the band experiments with some delicate acoustic arrangements, soaring pop/rock anthems, and heavier tracks that could have found a home on Ass Cobra. This is clearly the band’s most reflective and — dare it be said — melancholic statement, and even though the guitar pyrotechnics offered by Euroboy, who would join the group for Apocalypse Dudes, are absent, the songwriting is developed and mature. “Nihil Sleighride” is as cold and convincing as they come. An album later, the basic aesthetic was installed — all bandmembers dressed Clockwork Orange-like in full-denim regalia — and Euroboy’s stinging leads pushed the arrangements past the final hurdle. – Patrick Kennedy

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