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Far Away Trains Passing By

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (152 ratings)
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Far Away Trains Passing By album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Knuddlemaus
7:01
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02
Between Us and Them
7:29
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03
Passing By
6:35
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04
Blumenwiese Neben Autobahn
6:33
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05
Nobody's Home
7:36
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06
Molfsee
8:07
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Disc 2 of 2
01
Sunday Evening In Your Street
6:44
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02
Suddenly The Trees Are Giving Way
6:22
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03
Nothing Happens In June
6:17
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04
As If You've Never Been Away
7:00
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05
Crazy For You
6:32
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06
Wherever You Are
6:37
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 82:53

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Far Away Trains Passing By

bberckx

Awesome album. If it was vinyl it would be worn out

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Far Away Trains Passing By

EMUSIC-02B9BB5D

These songs are great. They age well. Far more thematic than other artists of this genre.

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Can I get a remix?

Wonky

I agree with pyxis that despite the beautiful sounds the percussion ruins it. Otherwise it would dreamy music. The composer should have more faith in the ability of the sound to pull the listener onward instead of depending on drum machines.

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Can't get enough

fleischman

Ulrich Schnauss fails to disappoint. This is great to chill to but is still extremely inspiring.

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Stop, Look, And Listen

buckeye_refugee

I was glad to see emusic make this title available because it is definitely his masterpiece up to this point. There is a definite influence of both Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream present in the music, however this less machine and more soul. This was my first introduction to the music of Ulrich Schnauss and it remains a must have for those dreamy road trips.

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Catch this train.

trope

less shoegazey than "A Strangely Isolated Place," which i didn't much like, this is a very different album. i recommend it as a starting point for his sound unless you are a shoegaze fan, since i picked both albums up and am already not listening to Strangely. Most of this one is very emotive and visual and largely nonvocal, at times reminiscent of cocteau twins' collaboration with harold budd

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Absolutely Amazing

captaintangent

I bought this in 2001 when it came out (as just the first 6 tracks), and have listened to it over and over again ever since. It is both gentle and monumental, melancholic and euphoric. It is soothes and it stuns, and it gets better and better with each listen.

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ambelodisiosis

pyxis

He's got the ambience down, he's got the melodyies down all beaitfully swimming around..but when he tries to incorporate drums and bass it sounds like he cooked up some poor presets out of the Betty Crocker cook book of synthpop. Get someone else on that end to compliment the other stuff and this would be brilliant

They Say All Music Guide

Thanks to Far Away Trains Passing By, an all-too-brief record that encompasses tingly breakbeat, icebox-cold electro, and nippy down-tempo, it shouldn’t be too long before Berlin’s Ulrich Schnauss gets name-dropping of his own in reviews of up-and-coming producers. Within these six tracks, Schnauss earns his comparisons to Boards of Canada and other members of the electronica elite with nary a reservation to be found. It’s not only the sheer strength of the majority of these tracks that make the record so enjoyable; the closing and ending numbers neatly bundle everything together, giving it the feel of a concept record without any of the pretensions. From the sun-kissed “Knuddelmaus” to the contemplative “Molfsee,” it’s a quicksilver spin through an expansive terrain of lush melodies, atmospheres, and beats that alternately jab and tickle. While the paramount “Molfsee” is the easiest point of reference as far as the Boards of Canada comparisons are considered — with its moody beauty so close to the duo’s “Everything You Do Is a Balloon” it isn’t funny — it also beguiles with a melody so spangly that it’ll have you running for your Cocteau Twins records to find which song it most resembles. There’s only one gripe to be had, and that’s the used-up-since-1990 beat that permeates “Nobody’s Home,” the only track that doesn’t work. Otherwise, this is a fine record that should have instant appeal to academic IDM types and melody-lovers alike. – Andy Kellman

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