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Anodyne

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (211 ratings)
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Anodyne album cover
01
Slate
3:25
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02
Acuff-Rose
2:36
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03
The Long Cut
3:20
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04
Give Back The Key To My Heart
3:26
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05
Chickamauga
3:43
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06
New Madrid
3:32
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07
Anodyne
4:51
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08
We've Been Had
3:27
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09
Fifteen Keys
3:25
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10
High Water
4:14
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11
No Sense In Lovin'
3:47
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12
Steal The Crumbs
3:38
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 43:24

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Wondering Sound

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Peter Blackstock

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Peter Blackstock was co-founder/co-editor of No Depression magazine from 1995-2008. He is co-author of SXSW Scrapbook (Essex Press, 2011), an informal history o...more »

09.23.11
An artistic epiphany well worth the road-less-traveled journey
1993 | Label: Sire/Warner Bros.

On March 16-20, 1992, Uncle Tupelo had found a way out of the post-punk trappings of their origins. Acoustic guitars and traditional music had provided a back door into an entirely different world, and if stepping through that door meant turning their back on alt-rock just as Nirvana et al. had opened the floodgates, the artistic epiphany that bloomed on Anodyne was well worth the road-less-traveled journey. Gone was the power-trio format; both Jay Farrar… read more »

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Ditto on 'masterpiece'

Kez

Anoydyne is THE Uncle Tupelo record. Masterpiece indeed.

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Masterpiece

61Blues

You can definitely hear these guys going their separate ways on this disc, which is a good thing! Spawning two of the best bands still in existence today and having inspired a movement that moves on to this day (check out The Wheat Pool on Emusic for instance). This one is my favorite from UT.

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If you don't kbnow, you better ax somebody!

Banjofreak420

This album was the beginning of it all for me as an alt-country fan. 15 years later it still holds up. You can almost hear Uncle Tupelo breaking up in the midst of this album. There is a definite division line between Tweedy's songs and Farrars songs. I once heard a review of this album that called it a cross between Neil Young and X which isn't far off. This is a classic album and one of the all time greats!!!

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Time Is Right for Getting Out While We Still Can

gregrmurphy

I expect someone else can give a full-on history of UT, Wilco, Son Volt, Farrar and Tweedy. I'll just note that this is one of my fave records ever.

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They Say All Music Guide

Uncle Tupelo never struck a finer balance between rock and country than on Anodyne, their major-label debut and parting shot. For all of the ill will undoubtedly simmering throughout these sessions, Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy have never before been more attuned to each other musically; where earlier records often found the band’s twin forces moving in opposing directions, Anodyne bears the full fruits of their shared vision. Recorded live in the studio, the album encompasses and reinterprets not only country-rock (evidenced by the group’s pairing with Doug Sahm on his “Give Back the Key to My Heart”) but also traditional country (the tribute to the songwriting legacy of “Acuff-Rose”), rock (the churning “The Long Cut,” “Chickamauga”), and folk (“New Madrid,” “Steal the Crumbs”), the band’s reach never once exceeding its grasp. – Jason Ankeny

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