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Solitaire

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Solitaire album cover
01
Say it in French
3:23  
02
As I Am
3:27  
03
Roll on
5:19  
04
Sonia Said
4:51  
05
Beartoes
4:53  
06
Inhaling You
4:09  
07
Hamsin
4:20  
08
Solitaire
5:22  
09
The Call
6:20  
10
Snort
3:53  
11
All The Way
4:15  
12
Twelve
3:53  
13
Blackbird
6:03  
14
Anaconda
5:35  
15
Country Life
2:25  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 68:08

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eMusic Features

0

The Compleat Uri Caine

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Uri Caine personifies the postmodern musical impulse; he's recorded straight-ahead and not so straightahead jazz, funk, klezmer, Brazilian pop, turn-of-20th-century Tin Pan Alley songs and breathtakingly novel and diverse arrangements of 18th and 19th Century classics. Depending on the setting, he'll play grand piano, electric piano, their ancestor the pianoforte (as when wittily improvising on Beethoven's Diabelli Variations), harpsichord, organ, synthesizers - pretty much anything involving black and white keys. Most anyone else trying all… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Solitaire, the first solo piano album by Uri Caine, is a tour de force. Recorded “with no processing” at Schloss Elmau in Germany, the disc was released in tandem with Bedrock and Rio (about as diverse a trilogy as can be imagined, and one that underscores the scope of Caine’s visionary musicianship). The piano on Solitaire sounds fabulous, with the kind of pure, natural echo that truly evokes a concert hall experience. Caine starts out swinging with “Say It in French” and makes profoundly bluesy, boppish statements with “Beartoes” and “Snort.” He maneuvers deftly between bright diatonic themes (“Roll On,” “Country Life”) and bracing modalism (“The Call,” “Anaconda”) and between rubato contemplation (“As I Am,” “Sonia Said,” “Inhaling You”) and busy, clustery harmonic bursts (“Twelve”). Even “Blackbird,” by far the most overplayed song in the Lennon and McCartney catalog, sounds fresh in Caine’s hands. So does the Jimmy Van Heusen chestnut “All the Way.” Caine has shown that he can think big, combining Mahler and turntables and such. Here, with nothing but 88 keys to work with, he makes music as electrifying as anything in his catalog. – David R. Adler

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