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Discover Indonesia

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01
Tetigo
1:43
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02
Kemayoran
4:53
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03
Gondang Si monang-monang
3:53
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04
Mares
4:57
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05
Curahan Hati
3:49
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06
Tabuh Kenilu Sawik
4:18
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07
Yendisare Aimando
3:24
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08
Stambul Bila
9:15
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09
Gandung Sia
5:05
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10
Padang Magek
6:01
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11
Tabung
4:16
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12
Kalimantan
1:35
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13
Teke Song
4:19
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14
Welasan
4:56
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15
Sampeq Penihing
8:31
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 70:55

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Chris Nickson

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Chris Nickson lives in Leeds, England, the city where he was born. He moved back to the UK in 2005 after spending 30 years in the US, where he freelanced for nu...more »

04.22.11
An ideal primer to some of the world's strangest, and sometimes remotest, places.
Label: Smithsonian Folkways

This compilation pulls from the label's exhaustive 20-album collection of Indonesian music, all recorded in the field. The sheer variety of music is overwhelming — not surprising, when thousands of islands make up Indonesia — and thrilling. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there's gamelan music (listen to the funeral piece "Tabung"), but there are plenty of unexpected pleasures, like choral pieces, and a xylophone duet, "Tetigo," which is simple and brief but eerily hypnotic. You have to wonder… read more »

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They Say All Music Guide

This is a great sampler of Smithsonian Folkways’ Music of Indonesia series, which is 20 volumes large. Adding the entire set to your music library will seem more reasonable — and necessary — after hearing this and realizing what an astonishing variety of music comes from Indonesia, which consists of over 13,000 islands. At the very least, this sampler will let you know which volumes to start with. This release offers a sampling of the country’s diversity with music from the forests of Sumatra’s mainland (Volume 7, here represented by the xylophone duet, “Tetigo”) to West Kalimantan (Volume 17, and here, “Kalimantan,” a ritual senggayung piece, played on seven bamboo) to Flores (Volumes 8 & 9, here represented by the a cappella choral festival piece, “Teke Song”) to Maluku (Volume 19, heard here on “Mares,” a surprisingly celtic-reminiscent string and drums dance number) to South Sulawesi (Volumes 15 & 18 focus on music from Sulawesi, but the folk guitar and singing heard on “Kemayoran” comes from the Indonesian guitar compilation, Volume 20). And, of course, there are also selections of music by gong and gamelan ensembles (Volumes 12 and 14, among others). Two gong ensemble selections appear on the sampler, “Tabuh Kenilu Sawik,” an upbeat, wedding piece and “Tabung,” which is played only at funerals, and one gamelan track from West Java, “Welasan.” Through Indonesia’s own internal variety, as well as the unexpected similarities to (and influences of) other cultures’ music, you begin to hear unguessed-at links between different cultures’ music. There is a wealth of music and musical history to be heard in this series. – Joslyn Layne

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