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Dengue Fever presents Electric Cambodia

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Dengue Fever presents Electric Cambodia album cover
01
Give Me One Kiss
Artist: Various Artists
3:05
$0.69
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02
Don't Speak
Artist: Various Artists
3:42
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03
Jombang Jet
Artist: Various Artists
3:41
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04
Flowers in the Pond
Artist: Various Artists
2:54
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05
Shave Your Beard
Artist: Various Artists
2:35
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06
I Will Marry You
Artist: Various Artists
2:27
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07
I Want to Shout
Artist: Various Artists
3:34
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08
Jasmine Girl
Artist: Various Artists
2:33
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09
I Want to Be Your Lover
Artist: Various Artists
3:22
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10
Hope to Meet You
Artist: Various Artists
3:18
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11
Snaeha
Artist: Various Artists
3:22
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12
I Will Starve Myself to Death
Artist: Various Artists
4:00
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13
Unknown Title
Artist: Various Artists
2:58
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14
Cold Sky
Artist: Various Artists
3:46
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 45:17

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rare views of urban life in cambodia in the 70s

martess

very fresh sounding, rock grooves of the late 60s and 70s as seen thro an urban cambodian lens. The sound quality is very retro, taken from old cassette tapes, sounds like. Yet authentic. What amazed me prsonally was how the same rock grooves have influenced the world, in the 70s, and if one listens to peruvian chicha, west african highlife (thanka analog africa), 70s bollywood, thai and now this cambodian collection, how similar and yet how each of these have their own distinctive signature of region of origin. Great retro from a time when all music had to be played on instruments, and no touching up by software or playin loops.

eMusic Features

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What We’re Listening To: February 2011

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

This month, we're doing something different and special with our staff picks hub: We've opened it up to members. Now, alongside our regular round-up of in-house faves, you'll get to see what other eMusic members are listening to, too. This means more great music, coming from more great sources. Would you like to submit your picks to the hub? Just drop a line to 17dots@emusic.com, and we'll get you in the schedule. Below, you'll find… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The band Dengue Fever have managed to build a career out of their obsession with Cambodian pop music of the 1960s and ’70s, and with this compilation, they’ve generously allowed fans to sample their treasure trove of rare recordings, rescued from battered cassettes brought back from visits to Southeast Asia. While the Sublime Frequencies label has been releasing fascinating compilations of Asian pop from this time period, the music on Electric Cambodia: 14 Rare Gems from Cambodia’s Past more closely walks a middle ground between the distinct melodic and vocal style of traditional Cambodian music and the insistent rhythms and electric instrumentation of Western pop and rock; instead of suggesting Asian folk music with some American pop added to the mix, these tunes tend to offer a more equal fusion of the two styles, and the creative and cultural mashups result in some inspired combinations. Highlights include the bright, kinetic sound of Ros Sereysothea’s “I Want to Shout” (complete with a killer guitar solo), the assured R&B shuffle of “Shave Your Beard” from the same act, “Give Me One Kiss” by Dara Chom Chan, which recalls an Asian girl group backed by a ska band, and several cuts from Pan Ron, including the polished but driving garage rock of “Don’t Speak,” some heavily rhythmic psychedelia with “Jombang Jet,” an appropriately melodramatic cover of Sonny Bono’s “Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)” dubbed “Snaeha,” and an untitled number that features some deadly fuzztone riffs Link Wray would admire. This music is wild and energetic fun, though it’s also a document of a short-lived era in Cambodian history that came to an end with the rise of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, whose efforts to rid the nation of modern Western influences led to the death of nearly all the artists represented on this disc. If there’s a tragedy lurking behind this music, at least Electric Cambodia allows a wider audience to hear this remarkable music, and you don’t have to be a collector of cross-cultural oddities to enjoy it. – Mark Deming

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