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El Bolero Mexicano: Humanidad

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El Bolero Mexicano: Humanidad album cover
01
Amor Perdido
Artist: Manolito Arreola
2:32   $0.99
02
El Que Pierde una Mujer
Artist: Ramon Armengod
2:51   $0.99
03
Hilos de Plata
Artist: Ana María González
2:59   $0.99
04
Un Poquito de Tu Amor
Artist: Pedro Vargas
2:52   $0.99
05
Nocturnal
Artist: Pedro Vargas
3:20   $0.99
06
Por la Cruz
Artist: Chela Campos
3:01   $0.99
07
No, no Y No
Artist: Fernando Albuerne
2:53   $0.99
08
Humanidad
Artist: Fernando Rosas
2:51   $0.99
09
Humanidad
Artist: Hermanas Hernandez
3:10   $0.99
10
Sabor de Engano
Artist: Hermanas Hernandez
2:49   $0.99
11
Sentencia
Artist: Hermanas Hernandez
2:37   $0.99
12
Desesperamente
Artist: Orquesta Juan Garrido
2:56   $0.99
13
La Numero Cien
Artist: Genaro Salinas
3:18   $0.99
14
Mi Cuba Bella
Artist: Tona 'La Negra'
3:04   $0.99
15
Vereda Tropical
Artist: Lupita Palomera
2:55   $0.99
16
Negra Linda
Artist: Juan Arvizu
2:54   $0.99
17
Dos Gardenia
Artist: Juan Arvizu
3:08   $0.99
18
Amor Perdido
Artist: Chucho Martinez
3:36   $0.99
19
Nadie
Artist: Amparo Montes
3:10   $0.99
20
Te Vas Qorque Quieres
Artist: Estela Mejia
2:24   $0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 59:20

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They Say All Music Guide

The long history of Latin recording has rarely been treated with the respect it deserves; too often, what little music lies in print is endlessly repackaged, leaving obscure material to do little but continue languishing. The French Iris label has done much to expand that conception, especially with Brazilian music (which, granted, is less in danger of disappearing) but also with Mexican music. This compilation of prewar Mexican bolero music is especially valuable, for introducing several artists to the digital medium and for including obscure material from more famous artists. The range of influences is wide, including native forms, American big-band pop, and even marching-band music. Performances from Toña la Negra (“Mi Cuba Bella”) and Pedro Vargas (“Un Poquito de Tu Amor”) are the highlights, but all of the music is intriguing for those with an interest in Latin music at mid-century. – John Bush

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