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The Earliest Negro Vocal Quartets (1894-1928)

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01
Keep Movin'
2:55
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02
Down On The Old Camp Ground
2:26
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03
Poor Mourner
1:48
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04
Steal Away
1:53
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05
Gabriel's Trumpet
2:42
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06
We'll Anchor Bye-And-Bye
2:37
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07
The Camp Meeting Jubilee
1:46
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08
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
2:52
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09
Shout All Over God's Heaven
2:27
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10
The Bonnie Blue Flag
4:01
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11
Laughing Song
3:32
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12
What A Time
3:46
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13
The Watermelon Party
4:14
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14
Rise And Shine
2:13
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15
The "Old Time" Religion
2:04
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16
Jerusalem Mornin'
2:01
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17
Oh What's He Done For Me
2:44
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18
Watermelon Party
2:50
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19
Bohunkus And Josephus
2:56
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20
Oysters And Wine at 2 AM
3:15
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21
Pussy Cat Rag
2:43
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22
When De Corn Pone's hot
2:37
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23
No Hiding Place Down Here
2:37
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 23   Total Length: 62:59

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They Say All Music Guide

A treasure trove for archivists, Earliest Negro Vocal Quartets (1894-1928) compiles 23 impossibly rare recordings spotlighting the African-American four-part harmony singing style which predated both jazz and the blues. The real treat here is the lone surviving recording by the Standard Quintette, 1894′s “Keep Movin’”; a cylinder cut for Columbia, it is in fact the only black music recording of its time to survive into the 20th century, and as a piece of history alone it’s invaluable. The first-ever commercial recordings by a black group, cut in 1902 by the Dinwiddle Colored Quartet, are included, as well, as are tracks by the Apollo Male Quartette and Polk Miller & His Old South Quartette. Understandably, the music here is buried under considerable surface noise; casual listeners may wish to pass, but for historians the release of Earliest Negro Vocal Quartets (1894-1928) is a major event. – Jason Ankeny

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