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The Unfortunate Rake

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01
The Unfortunate Rake
Artist: A. L. Lloyd and Alf Edwards
2:59
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02
The Trooper Cut Down in His Prime
Artist: Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger
4:30
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03
The Young Sailor Cut Down in His Prime
Artist: Harry Cox
1:57
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04
Noo I'm a Young Man Cut Down in My Prime
Artist: Willie Mathieson
2:17
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05
The Bad Girl's Lament
Artist: Wade Hemsworth
2:49
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06
One Morning in May
Artist: Hally Wood
2:36
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07
Bright Summer Morning
Artist: Viola Penn
2:24
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08
The Girl in the Dilger Case
Artist: D. K. Wilgus
1:08
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09
The Cowboy's Lament
Artist: Bruce Buckley
2:39
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10
Streets of Laredo
Artist: Harry Jackson
4:59
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11
St. James Hospital
Artist: Alan Lomax
3:33
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12
Gambler's Blues
Artist: Dave Van Ronk
2:44
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13
I Once Was a Carman - I Once Was a Carman in the Big Mountain Con
Artist: Guthrie T. "Gus" Meade
1:12
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14
The Lineman's Hymn
Artist: Rosalie Sorrels
1:49
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15
The Wild Lumberjack
Artist: Kenneth S. Goldstein
1:51
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16
Sun Valley Song, A
Artist: Jan Brunvand and Ellen Stekert
1:28
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17
The Ballad of Bloody Thursday
Artist: John Greenway
3:44
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18
Streets of Hamtramck
Artist: Bill Friedland, Mark Newman, and Morris Howarth
2:23
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19
The Ballad of Sherman Wu
Artist: Pete Seeger
2:07
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20
The Professor's Lament
Artist: Roger Abrahams
3:25
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 52:34

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Wonderful Trove

swilentz

Kenny Goldstein's work in the 1950s and 1960s has yet to receive its due, having been overshadowed by the re-discovery of Harry Smith's Anthology. The Unfortunate Rake offers a glimpse at a bygone world, a Manhattan (and Bronx) of long ago, rediscovering the many magic layers of folk music. The album is also a trove of expertly selected variations that shows how a single song evolved.

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An amazing Journey through time and cultures

Conticreative

First of all, I discovered this album after listening to the Smithsonian Folkways Podcast. The folksongs contained in the album trace their origin from England, to Scotland (as military songs), to the the US as Cowboy, lineman, labor and finally jazz songs (and even as a skier). The song then takes a detour as "The Streets of Laredo" the famous cowboy song sung by the likes of Jhonny Cash, Emilou Harris and Willie Nelson among many others. The theme remains similar, the song mutates and it finally ends, on this album with the "parody" derivaties. In the podcast, it goes further and it ends with "St. James Infirmary" the famous blues/Jazz standard from New Orleans. The melody and text have changed but the spirit of all these songs are the same. They are all part of a musical journey with few equals. This record is a must for anyone interested in music, musicology and culture in general. And get the podcast too as it makes a handy companion.

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