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Welsh Rare Beat

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Welsh Rare Beat album cover
01
Chi Sydd Ar Fai
Artist: Nia Ben Aur
0:47  
02
Y Gwylwyr
Artist: Bran
3:00  
03
Mathonwy
Artist: Huw Jones
3:55  
04
Di Enw
Artist: Sidan
2:28  
05
Hwiangerdd
Artist: Eleri Llwyd
1:41  
06
Dawns Y Pair
Artist: Endaf Emlyn
1:06  
07
Cwmwl Gwym
Artist: Y Dyniadon Ynfyd Hirfelyn Tesog
2:36  
08
Cynnwrf Yn Ein Gwlad
Artist: Yr Atgyfodiad
4:17  
09
Hedfan
Artist: Gillian Elisa
2:14  
10
Marw A Wnaeth Dy Dad
Artist: Morus Elfryn
2:43  
11
Y Brawd Houdini
Artist: Meic Stevens
3:20  
12
Nos Ddu
Artist: Heather Jones
3:41  
13
Y Cynllwyn
Artist: Gorffenwyd
1:43  
14
Godro'r Fuwch
Artist: Y Tebot Piws
3:31  
15
O Gymru
Artist: Eleri Llwyd
4:39  
16
Y Penderfyniad
Artist: Edward H. Dafis
3:18  
17
Dyddiau Dwys
Artist: Bran
5:29  
18
Blodeuwedd
Artist: Y Diliau
2:47  
19
Dwr
Artist: Huw Jones
5:03  
20
Calan Gaeaf
Artist: Edward H. Dafis
3:54  
21
Breuddwyd
Artist: Bran
3:37  
22
Y Crwydryn A Mi
Artist: Meic Stevens
2:54  
23
Mae Rhywyn Wedi Dwyn Fy Nhrwyn
Artist: Y Tebot Piws
4:33  
24
Penhryn Gwyn
Artist: Heather Jones
3:00  
25
Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau
Artist: Tich Gwilym
1:59  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 25   Total Length: 78:15

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Tim Noakes

Contributor

12.11.08
Various Artists, Welsh Rare Beat
2007 | Label: Finders Keepers Records (Twisted Nerve Recordings) / PIAS Digital

The humorously entitled Welsh Rare Beat is an epic feast of unheralded psych-folk treats from the Sain Records archive, brought back to the world's attention by Super Furry Animals 'singer Gruff Rhys.

At first, you may wonder why you should care about 25 forgotten Welsh artists with names like Y Dyniadon Ynfyd Hirfelyn Tesog, who sing in a language spoken by only 20 percent of natives. However, after the ominous introduction by throaty orator Nia Ben… read more »

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Welcome to the Welsh rock'n'roll Hall of Fame

rene.g

Remember Meic Stevens masterpiece "Gwymon" ? A universal classic in its own right. A harbinger of good things to come like Trwynau Goch or Anrhefn (70's) and better yet,Rheinallt H. Rowlands. The Welsh atre not as good as their Breton, Irish and Scottish cousins at folk, but they obviously can rock.

user avatar

CHWRW!

Staggerlee

This album is much greater than one could have hoped. Who knew such nuggets lurked in the hills of a nearly forgotten country? Fans of SFA will not be in the least disappointed, nor will crate diggers who thrive on cheese. Finders Keepers, please release WRB2 on eMusic... PLEASE!

They Say All Music Guide

Starting in the late 1960s, the Sain label recorded many Welsh-language releases that few have heard outside of Wales. It’s unfortunately hard to tell the exact chronological span of the 25 tracks assembled for this compilation, but basically it seems to feature the Welsh rock the company produced during the ’70s, the early to mid-’70s being the primary focus. Even within the collector community devoted to tracking down worldwide rock from the era that didn’t get a wide hearing, these performers are unknown, the only exception being Meic Stevens, though even he isn’t known to many listeners aside from British folk-rock specialists. The Welsh lyrics are going to make this hard to fully grasp for most listeners outside Wales, but basically this material combines some of the better elements of both ’70s progressive rock and the era’s British folk-rock, sometimes leaning in a decidedly folky direction. The thorough track annotation indicates that some of these cuts are inspired by mythology and folk tales, and much of the music does have a rather innocent, dramatically wistful air that will appeal to those who have a fondness for that sort of thing. It seems less pretentious than much of the English-language stuff produced in that vein during the same era, however, due in part to the relatively basic production (though almost everything sounds clear and professional), but also helped by some nice haunting melodies and singing. The folkier items tend to be the more pleasing ones here, but on the whole it’s a nice and diverse listen, recommended to both progressive rock and British folk-rock collectors in search of something different that they likely haven’t yet heard. – Richie Unterberger

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