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An Anthology Of Noise And Electronic Music Vol,1

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Disc 1 of 2
01
Corale
Artist: Luigi & Antonio Russolo
2:06
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02
Week End
Artist: Walter Ruttmann
11:23  
03
Cinq Etudes De Bruits: Etude Violette
Artist: Pierre Schaeffer
3:25
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04
Scambi
Artist: Henri Pousseur
6:33
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05
The Dresden Interleaf 13 February 1945
Artist: Gordon Mumma
12:11  
06
Trance #2
Artist: Angus Maclise, Tony Conrad And John Cale
5:12
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07
Untitled #1
Artist: Philip Jeck, Otomo Yoshihide And Martin Tétreault
6:11
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08
October 24, 1992: Graz, Austria
Artist: Survival Research Laboratories
6:15
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09
Ragout: Küchen Rezpt Von Einsturzende Neubauten
Artist: Einsturzende Neubauten
4:14
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10
Aspekt
Artist: Konrad Boehmer
15:14  
Disc 2 of 2
01
Hommage à John Cage
Artist: Nam June Paik
4:13
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02
Rozart Mix
Artist: John Cage
7:18
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03
Audience
Artist: Sonic Youth
6:00
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04
Poème électronique
Artist: Edgard Varèse
8:08
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05
Concret Ph
Artist: Iannis Xenakis
2:44
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06
Ftp > Bundle/conduit 23
Artist: DJ Spooky (Paul D. Miller)
8:15
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07
A Little Noise In The System (moog System)
Artist: Pauline Oliveros
30:22  
08
One Minute
Artist: Ryoji Ikeda
1:00
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 140:44

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 55

Andy Battaglia

Contributor

Andy Battaglia writes about music and culture of various other kinds from a home base in New York. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Wire, t...more »

04.22.11
Various, An Anthology Of Noise And Electronic Music Vol,1
2007 | Label: Sub Rosa / Believe Digital

It always helps to start at the beginning, and it would be hard to go back much further than the beginning of electricity itself. Some of the material in this strong historical primer does just that — or at least something close. The first track features Luigi Russolo, the Italian Futurist who wrote a manifesto for noise and machine music in 1913, and early tape-pieces by the likes of Pierre Schaeffer show what happened a… read more »

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Eclectic explorations

Tweezer

I'm giving the same review to each of the six volumes in this series, since the range, approach, and quality of each volume is uniform: Ranging across decades and continents, "An Anthology of Noise & Electronic Music" is an eclectic mix of styles and technologies in the history of the development of electronic music. Some is written for a broader audience--those drawn in by appreciations for rock and techno--and some is for a more limited audience, the avant-classical group who may have a more systematic, "academic" approach to composition. Composition styles range widely, and, as far as I can tell, no effort has been made by the curators at Sub Rosa to organize these volumes by any particular theme--nothing according to historical development, no "noise" versus "electronic," etc. I prefer my music that way, as if set to "random," but if you're looking for a more systematic education in noise and electronic music, you may be frustrated by the arrangements and juxtapositions of songs.

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all over the place

Dusty14

I'm sure the intention of this is to draw connections between electronic artists in disparate genres, and to make a point that they are all worthy of recognition. But while I love most of the classical and "pop" artists here, I don't necessarily want to hear them back-to-back, and I have many of these tracks already. This Anthology series would be perfect for picking out a personally meaningful compilation. Unfortunately, e-music no longer makes many of the tracks available individually.

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some people

Huhh

...don't understand this music and so they think it's shit while struggling with the concept that the tastes of others may not exactly fit with their limited world view of how things should be. Rather than post one star reviews, wouldn't it be better to just accept that you don't get it and leave it at that? Hopefully my five star review will balance this out a bit.

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An Anthology Of Noise And Electronic Music Vol 1

abello

hey, Andy Battaglia, whoever you are, thank you for this. It has opened a whole new world for me. To anyone reading: this is experiental music, don´t expect anything else or you will be dissapointed. If you are bored or listening to the same things over and over (chords, instruments, tonality, sounds, melodies, counterpoint, harmony, rythm) this record may be what you were looking for.

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Not at all a comprehensive anthology

waffletower

While I was surprised and happy to see the Gordon Mumma selection, I think that the there are too many artists represented in this compilation whose work have not had historical relevance. Had they removed tracks by Sonic Youth, Paul D. Miller, Ryoji Ikeda, Einsturzende Neubauten, Survival Research Laboratories and the trio of Philip Jeck, Otomo Yoshihide And Martin Tétreault, room would have been left to represent seminal work by Ussachevsky, Luening, Stockhausen, the Barrons', Subotnick, Chowning, Bayle, and Dhomont.

user avatar

Veeeeeeeery Strange......

GajaMan

After reading the review of this album, as posted by E- Music, I expected to be pleasantly surprised, considoring that the list which included this album also listed several of my favorite electronica albums, such as "5 Years of Get Physical" and "Leave Luck To Heaven" by Matthew Dear. I was disturbed by this awefull compilation of tune.....they weren't really even "tunes", more like random crackley sound bites collected and layed into tracks in a randomized order. The soundquality was dissapointing, the sound even more so. I can't fathom anyone wasting cash on this album, and if you are considoring doing so, BE WARNED!

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Uneasy listening

tritisan

I haven't purchased this album (yet), but I'm already pretty familiar with most of this music, thanx to Gordon Mumma, my electronic music teacher at UCSC ('89-'91). It's interesting to see how many of these tracks don't sound as "challenging" as they used to. John Cage's tape cut-up presaged a lot hip-hop production (as well as IDM and UK garage sounds). But then there's still a lot of "difficult" stuff here, stuff that you don't just casually listen to, but rather make a point of deeply going into, as you would with any great art. Thankfully, there's no 12 tone stuff here, which I simply cannot abide. Trivia question: What sound are we hearing on the Concret Ph track? . . . Answer: Charcoal.