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Tragicomic

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (70 ratings)

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Tragicomic album cover
01
The Weight of Things
2:17  
02
Macaca Please
4:54  
03
Aftermath
6:20  
04
Comin’ up
4:22  
05
Without Lions
2:54  
06
Mehndi
6:50  
07
Age of Everything
5:24  
08
Window Text
5:43  
09
I’m All Smiles
4:44  
10
Machine Days
7:28  
11
Threnody
6:08  
12
Becoming
3:38  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 60:42

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Call it Ravi Shankar meets Piano Jazz

Harmony3001

Ok, this will sound like a wierd combination--and this album is. This is sax quartet/piano trio classic jazz; however, this musical basis is from another continent--the Indian SubContinenet (taken from the BBC special "Around The World in 80 Faiths"). Vijay is definately an individual with his own sound. In my limited exposure to Ragas, there are themes that are cyclic; repeating often in the discouse of the melodic framework. Vijay does this, as well; but also adds chordal movements and modulation in a 'push-pull' methodology that makes the music 'catchy' and 'complex' at the same time. I'd have to say everyone should listen to a track or two to see if this music is for you--this is definately not beginners jazz

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new school

WL

all i have to say is listen to track 4. everthing else is good.

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Fresh

morical

I can hear Steve Coleman's influence here but Vijay has very much his own voice. It's edgy, modern music that doesn't get lost going out. Bravo! Track 4 downloads but doesn't play or burn.

They Say All Music Guide

Vijay Iyer and alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa blend their Indian heritage with the influence of their New York jazz experience in this striking session, where they’re joined by bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Marcus Gilmore. The haunting miniature “The Weight of Things” (credited to the entire quartet) leads into the furious protest song “Macaca Please” (the latter title based on a slur uttered by a U.S. senator during the 2006 campaign), a cauldron of many influences. Iyer’s dramatic reworking of Bud Powell’s obscure “Comin’ Up” gives it a more contemporary flavor, though the reggae rhythm gets tiresome after a while. Iyer’s solo interpretation of the standard “I’m All Smiles” is more conventional, though with a bittersweet flavor. “Threnody” is not to be confused with Marian McPartland’s composition; Iyer’s haunting melody has a sense of foreboding disaster. Recommended. – Ken Dryden

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