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Everything Goes Wrong

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Everything Goes Wrong album cover
01
Walking Alone at Night
1:44
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02
I Have No Fun
1:30
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03
Can't Get Over You
3:39
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04
The Desert
2:45
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05
Tension
2:33
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06
Survival
2:33
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07
The End
3:18
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08
When I'm Gone
3:32
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09
Out for the Sun
4:15
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10
I'm Not Asleep
2:03
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11
Double Vision
4:23
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12
You're My Guy
1:57
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13
Before I Start to Cry
2:24
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 36:36

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Andrew Parks

Contributor

When he's not filing news stories, shooting a live show or contributing the occasional feature for Wondering Sound, Andrew Parks edits and publishes self-titled...more »

05.26.10
Vivian Girls, Everything Goes Wrong
Label: In The Red / Revolver

The first time Vivian Girls released a full-length, it went out of print in 10 days. While a proper CD pressing dropped the following fall, the damage was already done: thanks to a torrential downpour of buzz — based on less than 30 minutes of music — the Brooklyn-based trio was linked to the so-called "shitgaze" movement, a concerted effort to push everything into the red. Everything except for those harmonies, which can be heard… read more »

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eMusic Features

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New Adventures in Hi-Fi

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D.I.Y. and hi-fi have rarely gone hand in hand. From the muscular crackle of Black Flag to the basement anthems of Guided by Voices, the sound of indie rock has long been the proudly noisy product of four walls and a four-track recorder. As laptops have replaced boomboxes, the aesthetic has endured, with bands embracing digital fuzz as a signal of both outsider cool and a thin wallet. But with the late-2000s lo-fi boom that launched… more »

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2011: Garage Rock Grows Up

By Mike McGonigal, Contributor

Four years ago, I flew from Portland to New York to see my favorite band, New Zealand's garage-pop trio the Clean, play three shows at a glorious pit called Cake Shop. The openers were Crystal Stilts, a Brooklyn group with no records out whose moody and noisy music pushed all the right buttons. I quickly befriended the group, especially guitarist JB Townsend and his then-girlfriend Frankie Rose, whose own band Vivian Girls were soon-to-be favorites.… more »

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Who Are…Grass Widow

By Caryn Ganz, Contributor

"A major theme in the way we work is we don't have a frontperson and we really do everything together," says Hannah Lew, "so I'm going to do my best to represent all of us." She makes a good point: Grass Widow's sound is completely dependent on interlocking voices and roaming guitar and bass lines that zip past and into each other, generating tense pockets of dissonance and beautiful moments of resolution. The group's second… more »

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Label Profile: Captured Tracks

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

File Under: Ragged, guitar-based indie pop; jangle-'n'-reverb forever! Flagship Acts: Beach Fossils, Wild Nothing, the Fresh & Onlys, the Girls At Dawn Based In: Brooklyn, New York When I first meet Mike Sniper, he's drinking Patron Silver at an Oyster Bar in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. From any other record executive, the scene would be typical to the point of almost seeming mundane. But Sniper is the founder of the tiny, ragged Brooklyn indie Captured Tracks, a label that prizes… more »

They Say All Music Guide

There’s something noble about sticking to your guns and riding out the backlash, something impressive about ignoring the hype and nonsense and making the album you want to make, damn the critics and blast the consequences. The Vivian Girls found themselves in a whirl of hype, plaudits, and indie rock-sized success after the release of their self-titled debut album in 2008. They quickly found themselves at the forefront of a lo-fi noise pop scene that took off very fast and crashed just as quickly as people moved on to the next thing. To their credit, the Girls didn’t move on and Everything Goes Wrong sounds very much like the first album: short, sharp, and punky songs influenced by C-86, shoegaze, girl groups, and classic punk rock played with a ramshackle abandon and with no real musical chops. The Vivian Girls have not wavered from their chosen sound one bit, and for that you have to respect them. If you liked the trio’s first album, there will be plenty here for you to like as well. – Tim Sendra

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