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If We Ever Make It Home

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If We Ever Make It Home album cover
01
You Had Me at My Best
4:19
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02
If We Ever Make It Home
4:10
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03
Turn on the Lights
3:53
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04
Ghost in This Town
3:58
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05
Why Makes Perfect Sense
5:17
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06
Trouble
4:03
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07
Nobody's Fool
3:38
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08
Into the Arms of You
4:20
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09
From Bad to Good
4:03
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10
Missing You
3:40
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11
Daddy and the Devil
3:46
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12
Somewhere Beautiful
5:04
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 50:11

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They Say All Music Guide

On his third studio album, If We Ever Make It Home, Texas singer/songwriter Wade Bowen takes a giant leap forward. Bowen’s 2006 Lost Hotel album revealed a raw talent that had yet to be completely fleshed out. Bowen was quick to stake his claim in the Americana market, but it was obvious he had a ways to go to match the music of his heroes, Texas singer/songwriters like Guy Clark and Robert Earl Keen. On If We Ever Make It Home, the Lone Star troubadour proves himself a challenger for the Red Dirt Music throne. Songs like the sensitive “Turn on the Lights,” a touching number that finds the singer struggling to pick up the broken pieces of a relationship he’s not quite ready to let die, and the lump-in-the-throat “Daddy and the Devil,” a bleak track about the fine line we sometimes walk between heaven and hell, hit the emotion button hard. Americana constant Chris Knight adds his crushed-glass vocals to the latter. Bowen treads the same musical territory as fellow Texans Randy Rogers and Kevin Fowler throughout the disc, especially on the fervent “Trouble.” Bowen delivers a dusty-throated vocal that his backing band smothers in a jangly, guitar-heavy sauce. In three albums Bowen has gone from up-and-comer to contender. – Todd Sterling

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