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Life'll Kill Ya

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (172 ratings)
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Life'll Kill Ya album cover
01
I Was In The House When The House Burned Down
3:04
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02
Life'll Kill Ya
2:47
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03
Porcelain Monkey
3:32
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04
For My Next Trick I'll Need A Volunteer
3:13
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05
I'll Slow You Down
3:13
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06
Hostage-O
4:06
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07
Dirty Little Religion
3:11
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08
Back In The High Life Again
3:13
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09
My Shit's Fucked Up
2:45
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10
Fistful Of Rain
5:18
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11
Ourselves To Know
3:17
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12
Don't Let Us Get Sick
3:06
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 40:45

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

04.22.11
Warren Zevon, Life'll Kill Ya
2003 | Label: IndieBlu Music / Entertainment One Distribution

Like most of those SoCal peers, Warren Zevon floundered in the '80s, a decade that was unkind even to singer-songwriters as august as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell. Despite the endorsement of fans from R.E.M. to crime novelist Carl Hiassen, not even hard-won sobriety could steer his career back on track.

Acting on a nudge from Jackson Browne, Artemis 'Danny Goldberg came to the rescue in 2000, just as Zevon was scuffling between demoralizing tours and… read more »

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Life will Kill ya

Bluescat

I bought the Wind and Life will kill ya at the same time and I feel the same way about both CD's(?) as noted below.. I write this note with tears in my eyes. I was a very casual fan of Warren Zevon until I heard this CD. The songs are so heartfelt and inciteful. As deep as the songs are they draw you in smoothly and subtly. A cd you can put on repeat for hours. A cry in celebration of life, he is missed.

user avatar

Back in the High Life at Last...

thrillingdetective

The excitable boy becomes a only slightly less excitable man and, after having survived the bad luck dancing school of the 80s, delivered this seamless, mature work, deftly balancing the scatological and the profound, the dumb and the wise, the giddy and the sober, the Saturday night and the Sunday morning. This is what gown up rock can be, for those of us who haven't forgotten how to laugh-- or cry. It signaled a rebirth of a career that would too soon be cut short. It's all here: passion, wit, grim defiance, black humor and even darker hope. And Winwood's never getting that song back. "Don't let us get sick," indeed.

user avatar

I Listen To Warren Every Day

DesertDirtDog

And every day I learn something. What I want to know is why he's not in the rock and roll hall of fame. We need to do something about that.

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The best of Zevon's late work

okayfine

"I Was In The House When The House Burned Down" and "My Shit's Fucked Up" are classics, the latter also being a song every person with a disability or serious illness should hear at least once.

user avatar

Soooo Good

damilee

My daughter calls me bi-polar when I listen to this cd. Because it makes me laugh and cry. What can I say? The guy really moves me. Music should do that, right?

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a fickle thank you

1000yardstare

Just when I think of dumping e-music, when my constantly revolving fickle music tastes are dry and need refreshment... I find a keeper. Always liking Mr. Zevon's early tunes, this has replaced that. Too bad he is gone. His thoughful tunes with simple, unprocessed melodies and background harmonies are music for my own personal Sunday morning revival.

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Holy Crap

Mr-Moneybags

this site has nothing i want to listen to except for this guy. no mika, no 3 days grace, no godsmack, no linkin park i mean wat the fucking fuck

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It Makes Me

PHERAMONES

Listening to WZ makes me drop whatever I'm doing, pick up my guitar and try to actually write that song that's been floating aimlessly around in my head for months.

user avatar

raw real Zevon

bbb_OK

I agree with "Latch" -- if you have not heard those three songs, "I Was In the House When the House Burned Down", "Life'll Kill Ya", and "My Shit's F*cked Up" -- you have to check it out. This is the raw, real Zevon, older and more filled with the taste of his life that he shares in this album, shares with precise mayhem, scourging honesty, and always the wonderment of what is humor and what is not. You hover with him in truths, trying to walk the razor edge between despair and hilarity; between sardonic biting fury and purest, guileless spirit... I think if you miss this album, and certainly those three songs, you've missed the essence of Warren Zevon. He is so greatly missed.

They Say All Music Guide

Conventional wisdom has it that rock & roll is the aural embodiment of youth culture, but as more artists who’ve devoted their lives to playing the stuff grow older, they’ve struggled to reconcile maturity with the recklessness of the music. No surprise, then, that few if any have had the courage to do what Warren Zevon did with his 2000 set Life’ll Kill Ya — create a concept album about aging, disease, decay and ultimately death. “My Shit’s Fucked Up” and the title tune are bleakly witty but unblinking glimpses into the abyss of mortality, “Don’t Let Us Get Sick” is a sadly hopeful prayer against the inevitable, “Porcelain Monkey” chronicles Elvis Presley’s long slide into fatal irrelevance, and the cover of Steve Winwood’s “Back in the High Life Again” transforms the song into a picture of a man struggling to convince himself he’s going to get out alive. Given its dominant themes, Life’ll Kill Ya is surprisingly light hearted; while Zevon seems to regard our long, slow march towards fate as some sort of joke, it’s clear that he thinks the joke is pretty funny, and the performances are confident and fully engaged, a pleasant surprise after 1995′s lackluster Mutineer. While Zevon handles most of the instrumentation, he had the good sense to bring in a rhythm section rather than letting synthesizers do the work, and Jorge Calderon and Winston Watson bring a human heartbeat to this music that counters the sometimes gloomy outlook. The sad irony is that two years after making Life’ll Kill Ya, Warren Zevon would be diagnosed with an inoperable case of mesothelioma that would claim his life in the fall of 2003, but the album’s themes ring even truer given the artist’s fate — Zevon was too bright a man to not know that Death was lurking somewhere, and on Life’ll Kill Ya, he sure doesn’t welcome him but is able to greet him with a smile and a handshake despite it all. – Mark Deming

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