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Viper of Melody

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (88 ratings)
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Viper of Melody album cover
01
Jump the Blues
2:18
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02
Driving My Young Life Away
1:52
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03
Viper of Melody
3:06
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04
Throwin' Away My Money
2:19
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05
Your Love and His Blood
2:06
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06
Working at Working
2:59
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07
Moving on #3
2:28
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08
Tropical Blues
3:40
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09
Dog House Blues
3:17
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10
High Rolling Train
4:03
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11
Midnight Stars and You
3:22
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12
Freight Train Boogie
2:01
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13
Lonesome Highway
3:31
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 37:02

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Write a Review 11 Member Reviews

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user avatar

Working at working

luis_8426

When I first heard this song on KPIG radio, I thought it was Hank Williams singing some song that I had never heard before! Just downloaded the it and will listen for some more songs to download.

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It's true

banomassa

Wayne can really jump the blues and make your hard times swing. With this music he really can do anything!

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Live at Sons of Hermann Hall

DontHave1

I saw Wayne last month (01/10) and he played quite a few from this album. I love his style and sound, and I think the songs here are as strong as on his earlier albums...Go see him live!

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Alt Country, schmalt country!

tone5446

Wayne Hancock makes consistently good albums and this is no exception it's a great mixture of rockabilly/ hillbilly & western swing. What is alt country anyway? I reckon its just something thought up by marketing executives so companies don't have to use any terms of description that end in the word "billy".they did a similar job with black music when they called it "urban" Is Alt country anything that isn't associated with the pop rubbish that passes for mainstream country music today?

user avatar

Wayne is the man

Earache

Wayne "The Train" Hancock has one of the most distinctive styles of any artist you'll hear. His western swing albums are fun to listen to and if you don't tap your toe as you listen, there's something wrong with your hearing.

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listened to the first six songs...

DigitalHobo

...and just downloaded the rest. How many bands/musicians fill an entire album with great songs? Not many.

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Ask Jay Farrar

ShakyToo

Bet he would tell you he has great respect for WtT and really likes this record. He's like that, a civil person.

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Western Swing

PatrikC

This another great one from Wayne! Please kill the "Alt-Country" genre. I think Americana is more suited. americanaradio.org Where Viper Of Melody is #15

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All aboard for Wayne "The Train" Hancock!

Mike-E-Dread

If you ain't above your raisin' (see previous clueless reviews) you'll love the new Wayne Hancock album. The influence spans Bob Willis and Hank Williams. The musical craft has come a long way from his earlier albums. This is the creativity that Hank III wishes he could accomplish (and often imitates). I really like "The Train!"

user avatar

Say Cosk

LoneStar

Apparently cataloging of artist here on emusic is not that important, seems to be a pretty random and loose thing. Not to mention multiple artist of the same name being lumped into one page. Seems emusic could do better service to both the artist as well as their customers.

They Say All Music Guide

There are plenty of people who attribute a reactionary, narrow-minded attitude towards country music and the folks who play it (and listen to it), but while it’s not often acknowledged today, hillbilly music in the 1920s through the ’50s was strongly informed by R&B and jazz, and blues, boogie, and swing were all key components of the country & western vocabulary during the music’s formative days. Wayne Hancock is a guy who lives for the music of country’s rough and tumble days in the ’40s and ’50s, so none of this is news to him, and while elements of jazz and blues have been a part of all his albums, he brings this side of the music into clearer focus on his sixth studio album, Viper of Melody. Hancock is a master of classic honky tonk, and tunes like “Working at Working,” “Driving My Young Life Away” and “Throwin’ Away My Money” conjure up the shade of Hank Williams as effectively as anyone alive, but there’s just a little less grit in Viper of Melody than in his previous sets, and a greater emphasis on the swinging side of traditional country. The sly and slinky title tune practically defines the nexus between classic jazz and country, “Tropical Blues” and “Freight Train Boogie” are great examples of how blues and its variants made their way into Nashville, and the opening number “Jump the Blues” finds Hancock pledging to “make the hard times swing,” a notion as relevant today as it would have been in the ’30s. Hancock can effortlessly write tunes in the classic idiom without sounding as if he’s drowning in nostalgia for an era he never knew (this is a man who can use the word “hep” and sound like he means it), and his rough but sweet vocal style is the perfect complement for the music. And as usual, Hancock has some gifted accompanists helping to bring this music to life (Izak Zaidman on electric guitar, Anthony Locke on steel guitar and Huckleberry Johnson on doghouse bass), and with producer Lloyd Maines at the controls, they put down Viper of Melody in less than two days, and it sounds as lively and as honest as a vintage 78. Before generic boundaries ruled popular culture, there were two kinds of music — good and bad. Wayne Hancock offers just a bit of a history lesson on Viper of Melody while showing he can play the good stuff as well as anyone on the bandstand today. – Mark Deming

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