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It's Frightening

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (1022 ratings)
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It's Frightening album cover
01
Percussion Gun
3:08
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02
Rudie Fails
3:24
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03
They Done Wrong / We Done Wrong
4:30
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04
Lionesse
3:10
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05
Company I Keep
4:10
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06
The Salesman (Tramp Life)
2:50
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07
Midnight And I
3:34
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08
Right Where They Left
3:29
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09
The Lady Vanishes
3:29
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10
Leave It At The Door
3:00
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 34:44

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Makes Milk Famous Hard to Embrace

freecarvejunkie

I liked the White Rabbits before this album..after It's Frightening, I loved them and couldn't wait for their next album...and then came Milk Famous. I keep trying to like it, I keep digging for some musical gem I over looked---only to remain bored with it. But like any relationship if you are trying to hard it's probably not working out, and Milk Famous may have ended my White Rabbits fling.

user avatar

Walkmen > Spoon

indiesoc

I love the Walkmen, so I liked WR's first album, which sounded a lot like the Walkmen. I don't really care for Spoon, so I don't like this album, which sounds a lot like Spoon. It's just that simple.

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Fresh

nexus

Nice new sound. It's great to come across something like this.

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meh

stodge

I can't really get into it. Sure it's full of energy, but there's just something I don't like about this album. Maybe I'll give it another listen or two, but I wouldn't put it in my best of lists.

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'Like'

Hollison

I really like this album. Lots of energy, especially on the first two songs (my favorites) but the rest of the songs while, a little more keyed down have good rhythm and are nice as well. The album has a nice flow as an entire piece.

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No kidding

EMUSIC-00BC7C2A

Amen Unsightly. Yeah, what is with the comparisons? Like them or don't, but who they sound or don't like has no effect on whether or not I download the album, which I did because it sounds like quality to me.

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Yeah, they sound like...

Unsightly

All these review seem stuck on comparing these guys with other artists, I don't think it's necessary. They sound JUST like The White Rabbits... pretty good. Heavy tribal beat and a whole lot of energy.

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worth a listen

dutchman4life

The Spoon comparisons are apt, but White Rabbits have yet to fully create the nuanced minimalism that Spoon are famous for. A significant step forward from their first album, this is worth listening to and I will keep an eye on this group in the future.

user avatar

Greatest album of 2009. Energetic.

Judgecool

Not the most experimental maybe, not the most innovative probably, but simply the most energetic, positive vibe delivering, never making you sleep. Great songs and execution.

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Not Frightening...

donato

Since it's release in May, White Rabbits have been getting some airplay in and around the Indie circles. This is not a bad release, it has some great songs with decent lyrics and sound. I found that some of the band's influences are The Specials and Aztec Camera. I found that they don't sound close to the bands mentioned but instead sound a lot more like Spoon which would make sense since the album was produced by Britt Daniel of Spoon. There are some good songs on the album like Percussion Gun, Rudie Fails, and Right Where They Left. They are decent but as a whole, I didn't find anything very unique from other bands that are out right now.

They Say All Music Guide

White Rabbits played “honky tonk calypso” on their much-loved debut Fort Nightly, but they go in a significantly different direction on It’s Frightening. Fort Nightly sounded like it could’ve been recorded in a speakeasy, and while its jaggedly catchy songs called to mind kindred spirits like Cold War Kids and the Walkmen, White Rabbits staked their own claim in this familiar yet off-the-beaten-path territory. For It’s Frightening, the band recruited Spoon’s Britt Daniel to produce, and the results sound … a lot like a Spoon album. It’s Frightening is far more focused and streamlined than its predecessor, with reverberating pianos and the occasional guitar, alternately raspy and falsetto vocals, and the kind of striking sound design contrasts that typify Daniel’s own band. While this style fits Spoon perfectly, it doesn’t always work for White Rabbits. It’s Frightening gets off to a strong start, with the aptly named “Percussion Gun” bursting in on Adam Ant-style Burundi Beats that make the most of the album’s roomy sound. “Rudie Fails” is even more direct, its carefully arranged layers taking nothing away from the charge of its pianos and Greg Roberts and Stephen Patterson’s dueling vocals. Best of all is the low-slung “They Done Wrong/We Done Wrong,” which keeps the momentum of the previous two songs but takes it on a winding journey through light and shadow (which is echoed later by “Right Where They Left You”). However, as It’s Frightening unfolds, it feels like White Rabbits and Daniel may have trimmed away too many of Fort Nightly’s rough edges; while none of these songs are bad, many of them aren’t immediately distinctive, especially when compared to the charming hodge-podge of the Rabbits’ debut. At times, the surroundings of these songs are more attention-getting than the meat of the music; “The Company I Keep” is undeniably pretty, but most notable for the way the band’s playing locks together and drifts apart unexpectedly. It’s Frightening’s more atmospheric moments are some of its most satisfying: the abstract “Lionesse” has little to get in the way of its spy/horror film theme pianos, while “Leave It at the Door” closes the album with a comforting blur of piano, flute, and hushed vocals. It’s Frightening is far from a bad album, but this collaboration between a formerly kitchen-sink band and a meticulous producer doesn’t always show the music off to its finest. – Heather Phares

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