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Spirit

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Spirit album cover
01
Matador
1:42
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02
She Is Gone
2:55
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03
Your Memory Won't Die In My Grave
3:27
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04
I'm Not Trying To Forget You Anymore
3:53
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05
Too Sick To Pray
2:40
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06
Mariachi
2:06
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07
I'm Waiting Forever
3:09
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08
We Don't Run
3:02
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09
I Guess I've Come To Live Here In Your Eyes
3:36
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10
It's A Dream Come True
3:59
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11
I Thought About You, Lord
4:12
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12
Spirit Of E9
4:58
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13
Matador
0:18
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 39:57

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eMusic Features

0

Icon: Willie Nelson

By Andy Beta, Contributor

Country music has created its fair share of superstars, icons and tragic figures, from Brooks & Dunn to Hank Williams to Patsy Cline; charlatans and chanteuses; white-hatted good guys like George Strait and black-clad firebrands like Johnny Cash. But it's also the lone American musical genre to also produce a sage among its ranks: Willie Nelson. He's that rare caliber of artist who can be signified by one name. His book The Tao of Willie… more »

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Bobby Charles: The In-A-While Crocodile

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Robert Charles Guidry was leaving a diner in his native Louisiana when he heard the words that would forever make him Bobby Charles. "See you later, alligator," the 17-year-old jive-talked to a friend, only to hear, like a gospel call-and-response, "In a while, crocodile" from a neighboring patron. He had been playing teen soirees with a combo called the Cardinals (no relation to the r&b vocal group of the same name) in the small town of… more »

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A Field Report from the New Country

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Whither country music - or will it wither? Most of the c&w on strut at the recent CMA awards had more to do with 80's power-rock and 00's teen-pop than the morning farm report. In recent years, an alt-country movement in such Willy-billy suburbs as Brooklyn's Williamsburg has waved a country flag, along with a taste for trucker's caps and Pabst Blue Ribbon. This isn't a sudden outcropping on the range; ever since Gram Parsons… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Of all the records Willie Nelson made in the 1990s and since that time, none is more misunderstood or ignored than Spirit. Coming as it did so quietly and unobtrusively in 1996, a year and a half before the celebrated Teatro, Spirit is Willie’s most focused album of that decade. Self-produced and featuring the sparest of instrumental settings — Willie and Jody Payne play guitars, Bobbie Nelson plays piano, and Johnny Gimble plays fiddle on certain tracks — Nelson weaves a tapestry, a song cycle about brokenness, loneliness, heartbreak, spiritual destitution, and emerging on the other side. The set begins with the instrumental “Matador,” which seems to usher in the atmospheric texture for this album. “She’s Gone” tells its heartbreak story with as much lilt and pastoral grace as is possible without being sentimental. Willie’s guitar soloing is gorgeous; he’s deep in the groove of the washes of Bobbie’s chords. Hearing a steel-string guitar play rhythm and a nylon-string guitar play lead is an interesting twist as well. But Nelson digs the notion of “She’s Gone” deeper into the listener’s consciousness with “Your Memory Won’t Die in My Grave”: “Been feelin’ kinda free/But I’d rather feel your arms around me/Because you’re takin’ away/Everything I ever wanted…./It’s a memory today, it’ll be a memory tomorrow/I hope you’re happy someday/”Your memory won’t die in my grave….” And when Nelson moves to the full acceptance issue as he does on “I’m Not Trying to Forget You,” the music is slightly off-kilter in the intro, as if the singer cannot come to grips with the song. Payne plays just behind Willie, stretching time, making it slip and shimmer all the way into “Too Sick to Pray,” the most devastating country waltz to be recorded since Johnny Paycheck’s Little Darlin’ albums. On “I’m Waiting Forever” and “We Don’t Run,” the sun begins to rise out of the heart’s bleak night and comes to the dawn of a new day in the life of love and spiritual connection. This is Nelson writing conceptually as he did early on with Phases and Stages and Red Headed Stranger, but he is at his understated best here, moving deeply into the skeleton of the song itself and what it chooses to reveal through the singer. And while Spirit is quiet, it’s a tough, big record that makes you confront the roar of silence in your own heart. – Thom Jurek

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