|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

The Alchemist

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (19 ratings)

We’re sorry. This album is unavailable for download in your country (United States) at this time.

The Alchemist album cover
01
Walk Between the Lines
3:26  
02
If Crimson Was Your Colour
3:49  
03
Leva
4:35  
04
Hey Doctor
5:14  
05
Samaritan Burden
6:29  
06
Remembered
5:16  
07
The Alchemist
14:36  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 7   Total Length: 43:25

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 2 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Not available in US! ???

Unruh

make it available!

user avatar

great band

nonstoner_stonerrocker

great band. must be nice to live in a country where this download is available. whats going on with this EMusic?????????????????

They Say All Music Guide

Black Sabbath is rightfully considered a trailblazer of the doom metal genre. But the next group in line to carry the doom torch was Pentagram, a U.S. band well versed in their Ozzy and Iommi-isms. While Pentagram never scaled the heights that the Sabs did, they certainly left their mark on countless subsequent bands throughout the world — especially Sweden’s Witchcraft. On their third release overall, 2007′s The Alchemist, the quartet continues attempting to turn the clock back to 1975 — Magnus Pelander’s vocal delivery is an awful lot like Pentagram’s Bobby Liebling, while the music would provide a fine soundtrack to a high school stoner’s basement party — when the folks were out of town, the bong smoke was thick, and the black light posters were proudly on display. However, as with most doom metallists, quite a few bits have a certain familiarity to them — case in point, “If Crimson Was Your Colour,” which contains a riff reminiscent of Megadeth’s “Symphony of Destruction,” while “Hey Doctor” contains the same drum breakdown in the middle of Sabbath’s Vol. 4 obscurity “Under the Sun/Every Day Comes and Goes.” But the group also shows they aren’t afraid of laying down a Wolfmother-esque groove from time to time, as evidenced by the opening of “Samaritan Burden.” Doom metal continues to thrive in the early 21st century, as evidenced by the emergence of Witchcraft. – Greg Prato

more »