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Tidings

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Tidings album cover
01
Season Pt. 1
1:16
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02
Black Water
4:35
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03
Interlude: Plains/Banjoe
0:33
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04
Cotton Strands
4:34
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05
Interlude: Circle/Viking/Colours
4:10
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06
Storm Cloud
3:22
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07
Interlude: Grandfather
1:00
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08
Interlude: Scraps
0:51
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09
October Fires
4:22
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10
Interlude: Mercy Fragment
1:29
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11
April
1:09
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12
Untitled
2:54
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13
Interlude: Cotton Fragment
1:14
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14
Empty Heart
3:53
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15
Season Pt. 2
1:01
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 36:23

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Ian Cohen

Contributor

Ian Cohen caused a minor uproar after panning the first Presidents of the United States of America LP in his high school newspaper, and not much has changed sin...more »

01.24.12
Wolf People, Tidings
Label: Jagjaguwar / SC Distribution

Wolf People’s debut Tidings feels like it was plucked out of a time warp. For one thing, the frazzled, fuzzbox guitar leads, sitar-like drones and analog warmth of Tidings‘ production immediately recall an alternate reality where the Zombies and Love not only became superstars, but influencers, hefting the same power as the Beatles or Beach Boys. But Tidings is also out of time with itself; this is a re-release of a record that came out… read more »

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Excellent Find

stuartdix

Took a couple of listens but this album feels like it's grower. Check out Tiny Circle on YouTube as well.

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Gandson of Mirror Man

JBB

Groups like the Trembling Bells, Colour Haze, the recent “freak folk” of those such as Newsom and Bandhart and of course The Fall, assimilates the most creative of past styles effectively (60’s -70’s roots folk rock, San Francisco psychedelia, ISB-T. Rex folk-rock...and the Fall assimilating themselves). Others such as Crooked Vultures do so somewhat less effectively but to a larger audience. Wolf People have mined slightly different genres of late 60’s British pop blues rock, Frank Zappa style sampling and Captain Beefheart (number one on their immense Myspace list of influences.) This approach is more than simply a collage. One can hear a bit of Traffic in one section, Jethro Tull in another, and especially the great Mirror Man-Trout Mask era Magic Band guitar stylings and drumming... all before all morphing into brilliant edgy pop. (...the title was supposed to be “Grandson of Mirror Man”)

They Say All Music Guide

Tidings is perhaps not quite an “official” debut album in that it compiles the singles Wolf People have released thus far, paving the way for their proper debut, but plenty of bands have started out exactly the same way, and it’s as enthralling an introduction to the young British band’s kaleidoscopic beard-rock world as anyone could want. It’s impossible to talk about Tidings without discussing its obvious antecedents, just as it’s impossible to assess the Rolling Stones’ early recordings without mentioning the Chess blues roster. Wolf People basically sound like John Peel’s wet-dream band circa 1970, as they appear to have soaked up all manner of late-‘60s/early-‘70s psych, folk-rock, proto-prog, and blues-rock influences. Traffic, Family, the Edgar Broughton Band, early (pre-prog) Jethro Tull, and the quirkier side of Cream seem to be the most obvious touchstones, but making one’s way through Tidings is like thumbing through the battered vinyl collection of your weird uncle with the long, gray hair who still talks about following Hawkwind around in 1971; one moment there’s a stuttering guitar lick that screams early Mothers of Invention, the next there’s a stately romp that could have fallen out of the back of the Fairport Convention van during their Liege and Lief tour, and enough backwards guitars and tootling flutes to fill 50 psych-folk samplers. It should be noted that Wolf People seem not to have shied away from these types of references, either. The Rock Journalism 101 cliché is to say that a band like this assimilates the lessons of the past and pumps them out in a way that’s distinctly “today,” but that’s not exactly the case. While the music of Wolf People is undeniably vibrant, vital, and visceral, it does not attempt to put any modern (or post-modern) spin on its building blocks; rather, it embraces all the aforementioned influences and moves out into the world as a living, breathing, very natural extension of them. Who could ask for anything more? – James Allen

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