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Woody Herman Orchestra: Reunion at Newport

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Disc 1 of 2
01
Blue Flame
2:52
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02
La Fiesta
5:58
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03
Woodchopper's Ball
4:45
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04
Pavane, Op. 50 (arr. for jazz ensemble)
6:21
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05
Reunion at Newport
10:33
 
06
Sugar Loaf Mountain
5:03
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07
Laura
5:17
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08
Fanfare for the Common Man
9:50
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09
Giant Steps
8:20
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Disc 2 of 2
01
I Got It Bad (and That Ain't Good)
5:44
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02
Take the A Train
3:50
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03
The Happy Ending: What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?
6:37
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04
Caldonia
13:17
 
05
Blue Flame
1:30
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06
Cousius
2:40
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK // LIVE

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 92:37

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Reunion at Newport

Highnote

This album is also out, titled La Fiesta. recorded 11.1.78 and released in 1991 on a German label.

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Worth Acquiring... however

EMUSIC-006A98E4

it sure would be nice if emusic would provide the actual recording date and location (allmusic does not list this recoding, not to mention personnel! Personnel is probably similar to the Road Father album (e.g. Birch Johnson trombone on Sugar Loaf Mtn.. Woody does have some reed issues on this one, and there are a few other week moments, but it is a live recording of a band constantly doing one nighters. Lots of great solos.

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Snapshot of Late 70s Woody

salmonhead57

When asked if the big bands would ever come back, Harry James always replied that the good ones never went away. Woody was the last of the originals to leave the road. This recording was one of 300+ gigs a year the Woody Herman Orchestra played in the 70s and 80s. An evening of exceptional music, with a mix of older tunes Woody was obligated to perform as well as some of his late, extraordinarily innovative masterpieces like Fanfare for the Common Man, Pavane and La Fiesta. A must for fans, and a great introduction for others.

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