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Anna Reynolds

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Wikipedia:

For the English opera singer, see Anna Reynolds (singer).

Anna Reynolds (born June 1, 1968) is a British novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. She is the author of Tightrope (1991) and Jordan, which was voted "Best Play of 1992" at the Writers Guild Awards, and co-author of The Winding Sheet, a film that won a Silver Hugo at the Chicago Film Festival. Her first novel, Insanity, was published in 1996.

^ Anna Reynolds' webpage, writewords.co.uk.

Publications[edit]

Reynolds has had 10 plays professionally produced, including Jordan, Red (Clean Break Theatre Company), Precious (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Wild Things (Salisbury Playhouse), Look At Me (Theatre Centre/Mercury Theatre), Deep Joy (Mercury Theatre), Skin Hunger (Time Out Critics Choice, BAC), Ring Road Tales (Watford Palace Theatre), and Sweetie Pie (Menagerie Theatre Company, Cambridge Arts Centre and Latchmere Theatre London). Her screenplay Paradise was broadcast by the BBC and The Winding Sheet by Channel 4 Television in the UK.

She has written for The Times, The Guardian, New Statesman, The Observer, and The Big Issue.

She is one of the founders of the British writers' group writewords.org.uk.

Contents

Publications^ Cite error: The named reference bio was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

Personal life[edit]

In 1986, at the age of 17, Anna Reynolds murdered her sleeping mother with a hammer. She was sentenced to life in prison, and sent to Durham Prison, but her conviction was overturned after two years when Reynold's won an appeal after it was discovered she was suffering from a hormone imbalance, premenstrual stress syndrome, based on evidence provided by Dr Katharina Dalton. Reynolds was then sent to a mental health institute in Northampton to seek additional help.

^ Nick Curtis "Nothing but the truth", The Independent, 23 March 1994^ Lauren Slater "The Prophet of PMS", New York Times, 28 December 2004^ Sharon Feinstein "I don't have the right to grieve for my mother ... I killed her", Sunday Mirror, 30 June 1996