|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Erykah Badu

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (1391 ratings)
  • Erykah Badu

  • Erykah Badu

  • Erykah Badu

  • Erykah Badu

  • Erykah Badu

Albums

Biography All Music Guide

All Music Guide:

She grew up listening to '70s soul and '80s hip-hop, but Erykah Badu drew more comparisons to Billie Holiday upon her breakout in 1997, after the release of her first album, Baduizm. The grooves and production on the album are bass-heavy R&B, but Badu's languorous, occasionally tortured vocals and delicate phrasing immediately removed her from the legion of cookie-cutter female R&B singers. A singer/songwriter responsible for all but one of the songs on Baduizm, she found a number 12 hit with her first single, "On & On," which pushed the album to number two on the charts.

Born Erica Wright in Dallas in 1971, Badu attended a school of the arts and was working as a teacher and part-time singer in her hometown when she opened for D'Angelo at a 1994 show. D'Angelo's manager, Kedar Massenburg, was impressed with the performance and hooked her up with the singer to record a cover of the Marvin Gaye/Tammi Terrell duet "Precious Love." He also signed Badu to his recently formed Kedar Entertainment label, and served as producer for Baduizm, which also starred bassist Ron Carter and members of hip-hop avatars the Roots on several tracks. The first single, "On & On," became a number one R&B hit in early 1997, and Baduizm followed it to the top of the R&B album charts by March. Opening for R&B acts as well as rap's Wu-Tang Clan, Erykah Badu stopped just short of number one on the pop album charts in April. Her Live album followed later in the year.

In 2000 she returned with her highly anticipated second studio album, Mama's Gun, which was co-produced by Badu, James Poyser, Bilal, and Jay Dee and contained the hit single "Bag Lady." Worldwide Underground, a loose affair billed as an EP despite being longer than many full-lengths, was released in 2003. Her next step, 2008's New Amerykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War, was a heavy and abstract release featuring collaborations with the members of Sa-Ra and Georgia Anne Muldrow; it reached number two on the Billboard 200 and Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Albums charts. New Amerykah, Pt. 2: Return of the Ankh, looser and more playful than Pt. 1, followed in 2010.

Tour Dates All Dates Dates In My Area

Date Venue Location Tickets
07.02.15 Mercedes-Benz Superdome New Orleans, LA US
07.03.15 Mercedes-Benz Superdome New Orleans, LA US
07.04.15 Mercedes-Benz Superdome New Orleans, LA US
07.09.15 Grant Park Chicago, IL US
07.10.15 Miller Auditorium Kalamazoo, MI US
07.11.15 Chene Park Detroit, MI US
08.08.15 Merriweather Post Pavilion Columbia, MD US
08.09.15 nTelos Wireless Pavilion Portsmouth, VA US
08.13.15 Dell Music Center Philadelphia, PA US
08.15.15 Chene Park Detroit, MI US

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Erykah Badu’s New Amerykah Part One (4th World War)

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Erykah Badu’s New Amerykah Part One (4th World War)

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Go-Go Music!

By Jeff Chang, Contributor

Once upon a time, Washington D.C.'s go-go and New York hip-hop were both local party music sounds known to a select few. They were very much alike — stripped-down music relying heavily on percussive breakdowns and what "proper" musicians would dismiss as mere vamping, hosted by smooth mic operators who shouted out as much as they rhymed and talked more than sang, keeping the parties going continuously for hours. Go-go has bubbled up into the edge… more »

Activity