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Houston Person

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (13 ratings)
  • Born: Florence, SC
  • Years Active: 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s

Albums

Biography All Music Guide

All Music Guide:

In the 1990s, Houston Person kept the soulful thick-toned tenor tradition of Gene Ammons alive, particularly in his work with organists. After learning piano as a youth, Person switched to tenor. While stationed in Germany with the Army, he played in groups that also included Eddie Harris, Lanny Morgan, Leo Wright, and Cedar Walton. Person picked up valuable experience as a member of Johnny Hammond's group (1963-1966) and became a bandleader in the following years, often working with the late singer Etta Jones. A duo recording with Ran Blake was a nice change of pace, but most of Houston Person's playing has been done in blues-oriented organ groups. He recorded a consistently excellent series of albums for Muse, eventually switching to HighNote Records for 2006's You Taught My Heart to Sing, 2007's Thinking of You, and 2008's Just Between Friends, which featured bassist Ron Carter. Released in 2012, Naturally, recorded at the famed Van Gelder Recording Studio, teamed Person with Cedar Walton on piano, Ray Drummond on bass, and Lewis Nash on drums. He quickly followed that album with the similarly inclined 2013 effort Nice 'n' Easy. In 2014, Person returned with The Melody Lingers On.

Tour Dates All Dates Dates In My Area

Date Venue Location Tickets
12.16.16 Dazzle Jazz Denver, CO US
12.16.16 Dazzle Jazz Denver, CO US
12.17.16 Dazzle Jazz Denver, CO US
12.17.16 Dazzle Jazz Denver, CO US

eMusic Features

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Ran Blake: the New Englandest New Englander

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Ran Blake is one mysterioso pianist. His playing smacks of deep, complicated feelings, like melancholy, or nostalgia, where painful longing and sweet remembrance mix. His right hand - could be one finger - might hammer out a melody like a brass bell, choosing notes with a poet's care, while his left hand plumbs the depths, with low dissonant chords made all the more ambiguous via subtle foot pedaling. Other pianists abuse the sustain pedal for… more »