|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Ken Parker

Rate It! (0 ratings)
  • Born: Jamaica
  • Years Active: 1960s, 1970s, 1980s

Albums

Biography All Music Guide

All Music Guide:

Jamaican singer Ken Parker was born around 1948 (there is some confusion as to his birth year), growing up in Savannah-La-Mar in the Westmoreland Parrish area of Jamaica, where his father was a preacher. Parker was exposed early to the effects of gospel music, and he drew on gospel inflections in his vocals throughout his whole career. His first group was The Blues Benders, formed in 1965, but by 1967 he was a solo act, recording sides for most of the big Jamaican producers of the day, including Coxsone Dodd ("My Whole World Is Falling Down" was recorded at Studio One and was a huge hit on the island in 1969), Duke Reid ("True, True, True," one of Parker's finest sides, was recorded at Treasure Isle, as was "Jimmy Brown"), Bunny Lee, Rupie Edwards, Byron Lee, Joe Gibbs, and Lloyd Charmers (Parker recorded a fine version of Curtis Mayfield's "Queen Majesty" for Charmers). In time Parker became somewhat disillusioned with the workings of the Jamaican music scene and relocated to the U.K., where since the 1980s he has run his own label and production company.

eMusic Features

0

Reggae’s Ba-Ba Boom Time

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Despite the fire and brimstone that characterized reggae's revolutionary emergence in the 1970s, I have always had an abiding affection for the evolutionary period that immediately preceded that breakthrough, when the music seemed caught between two worlds. The style is usually referred to as rocksteady - post-Ska, but still experimenting with and expanding the possibilities of that one-drop, loping afterbeat; and though Rastafarian ideology was already beginning to swiftly gospelize the music (anthemed most notably… more »