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Nat Stuckey

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  • Born: Cass County, TX
  • Years Active: 1950s, 1960s, 1970s

Albums

Biography All Music GuideWikipedia

All Music Guide:

Nat Stuckey originally worked as a DJ before forming his first country band in the late '50s and becoming a regular on the Louisiana Hayride show. It was during this time that he was signed to the Paula label out of Shreveport, LA, and scored a minor hit with 1966's "Sweet Thang." The song was not nearly as popular as his next hit, however. Unfortunately for Stuckey's performing career, it wasn't him who made it famous. The song was "Waitin' in the Welfare Line" and it was a hit for Buck Owens. Though Stuckey profited from the publishing royalties, it did little for his own recording career, and beyond a few minor hits such as 1968's "Plastic Saddle" and "Sweet Thang and Cisco," Stuckey never broke through as a performer in his own right and soon disappeared from country music altogether.

Wikipedia:

Nathan Wright "Nat" Stuckey (December 17, 1933 – August 24, 1988) was an American country singer. He recorded for various labels between 1966 and 1978, charting in the top 10 of Hot Country Songs with "Sweet Thang", "Plastic Saddle", "Sweet Thang and Cisco" and "Take Time to Love Her"

^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 410. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. ^ Nat Stuckey at Find-A-Grave

Biography[edit]

Reared in Atlanta in Cass County, Texas, Stuckey attended Arlington State College, now the University of Texas at Arlington, from which he earned a radio and television degree. Nat established himself as a radio announcer, first at KALT in Atlanta, Texas, and then at KWKH in Shreveport, Louisiana, where he worked alongside legendary announcer Frank Page. At KWKH, Stuckey, along with Jim Reeves, became a member of the former Country music show known as the Louisiana Hayride.

In 1965, Stuckey co-wrote Buck Owens' number-one single "Waitin' in Your Welfare Line". He then wrote and recorded "Sweet Thang" on Paula Records.

Another of Stuckey's compositions, "Pop a Top", was recorded by Jim Ed Brown on RCA Records in 1967. A year later, Stuckey signed with RCA himself. Among his hits for RCA were "Plastic Saddle" and "Sweet Thing and Cisco".

Stuckey teamed with Connie Smith on the duet of "Young Love", followed by another single and two albums. The duo was in the final nominations for a Grammy for their version of "Whispering Hope".

After seven years with RCA, Stuckey signed with MCA Records. With Conway Twitty and David Barnes producing, his single "Sun Comin' Up" made the top 20, but none of his other MCA releases did. He last charted in 1978 with the number 26 single "The Days of Sand and Shovels".

Stuckey also went on to direct in producing sessions, along with announcing and singing jingles on hundreds of regional and national commercials. He wrote two jingles for Coca-Cola in the 1970s, recorded twenty-two spots of McDonald's, and was the singing voice on the last Spuds MacKenzie commercial for Budweiser. He continued recording jingles into the 1980s.

Another project was the ownership of Music Row Talent, Inc., a booking agency in Nashville, Tennessee, which was in business for twelve years. Through his Texas Promise Land Development Company, Nat began acquiring land in both Tennessee and Texas.

Shortly before Stuckey's death, Randy Travis released "Diggin' Up Bones", which Stuckey co-wrote.

^ Cite error: The named reference whitburn was invoked but never defined (see the help page).^ "Frank Page Obituary". Shreveport Times. Retrieved January 12, 2013.