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The King Khan & BBQ Show

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Albums

Biography All Music Guide

Group Members: BBQ, King Khan, King Khan & The Shrines, King Khan & His Shrines

All Music Guide:

A Canadian garage rock duo tangentially based out of Montreal, Quebec, the King Khan & BBQ Show mix doo wop, punk, soul, and who knows what else into a loose, wild sound that is drenched in pure raw energy. The duo at the heart of things is Mark Sultan (BBQ) and Blacksnake (King Khan), both former bandmates in fellow Montreal band Spaceshits, which disbanded in 1999. Sultan started a new band (Les Sexareenos) before going solo in 2002, playing gigs as a one-man band under the name BBQ. Blacksnake, meanwhile, had formed King Khan & His Shrines, and the two former bandmates met up and began writing songs together at Blacksnake's home in Germany, venturing out to play the occasional show in Germany and Spain, with Blacksnake now billed as King Khan. A debut album by the duo, The King Khan & BBQ Show, was released in the United States on Goner Records and in Europe by Hazelwood Records in 2004. An international tour followed, with a second album, What's for Dinner?, appearing on In the Red Records in 2006. A third album, Invisible Girl, emerged three years later in 2009, also on In the Red Records.

eMusic Features

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Label Profile: Goner Records

By Austin L. Ray, Contributor

File under: Blistering punk, scrappy garage, other assorted oddities Flagship Acts: Jay Reatard, Ty Segall, Reigning Sound, Eddy Current Suppression Ring Based In: Memphis, Tennessee Memphis label Goner Records was born out of - and has been sustained by - happy accidents. The first occurred in 1993 at the second-annual Garage Shock festival in Bellingham, Wash. Japanese rockers Guitar Wolf showed up to the fest uninvited, accompanying fellow Japanese bands Jackie & the Cedrics and the 5.6.7.8's (the… more »

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An Introduction to the Yardbirds

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

There were many British bands that swiveled rock's glorious adolescence, but for my nascent psychedelia and guitar drool, the Yardbirds have long held the most resonance. The wonder of first hearing the extended rave-up of "I'm A Man;" the Gregorian chants of "Still I'm Sad;" the eastern swami of "Over Under Sideways Down;" the clarion clang of the harpsichord in "For Your Love" forever changed for me how I would hear rock music. I sometimes think… more »