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road show

At eMusic, our goal is to help you discover your next favorite artist.

To help make this happen, we filmed some of our favorite up-and-coming artists in their natural habitat — the concert stage — and loaded up the eMusic van to bring this exclusive footage to city walls across the country.

Why? Because we think they’re great, and because we think that you’ll think they’re great, and because we want to share the music that matters.

Follow us on twitter to see where we’re headed next. Stop by to enjoy the show and other gifts! And of course, visit eMusic Selects for more discoveries from our editors.

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The Road Show

No Age Projected in NYC, Atlanta, Miami, Austin, LA, and Chicago

Watch the performance

Watch the performance

We survived unruly mosh pits and twisted ankles at the Music Hall of Williamsburg just so we could bring you a better angle of No Age tearing it up on stage.

Interview With No Age

Interview With No Age

Watch our exclusive pre-show interview to find out which Sonic Youth album inspired Randy Randall and which little-known English group the band believes "definitely could use their day in the sun."

We Say...

Part of Sub Pop's mission is documenting fertile underground-rock scenes, and one of the liveliest of recent years is centered on the L.A. club The Smell. Its house band, more or less, is this arty, chaotic duo. No Age's music is only a part of their broader package of design and artifact-creation, and like most of the rest of the things they've...
Part of Sub Pop's mission is documenting fertile underground-rock scenes, and one of the liveliest of recent years is centered on the L.A. club The Smell. Its house band, more or less, is this arty, chaotic duo. No Age's music is only a part of their broader package of design and artifact-creation, and like most of the rest of the things they've put their name on, it balances accidents and spontaneity with a deliberate, neon-gaudy aesthetic — some of the tracks here are through-composed noise-pop songs, some of them are improvised textural pieces, and in a few cases it's hard to tell. Randy Randall sings like somebody's dragging him away from the microphone (his lyrics usually abjure sense almost altogether: "It's a problem without too/ Trying to come up inside"); Dean Spunt's drumming is loud, hard and minimalist. The center of No Age's sound, though, is Randall's coruscating waves of guitar noise — sometimes just layers of grot and buzz, sometimes coalescing into itchy riffs whose simplicity connects the band to the generations of L.A. punks before them.

Sonny & The Sunsets Projected in NYC, Atlanta, Miami, Austin, LA, and Chicago

Watch the performance

Watch the performance

We captured this intimate show at the Mercury Lounge. We loved the performance. And Sonny’s sweater.

Interview With Sonny & the Sunsets

Interview With Sonny & the Sunsets

We sat down with the band before the show because we're dedicated to bringing you more about the music. And also because they said yes. Find out whose Echo & The Bunnymen obsession led him to some rather interesting Christmas gifts.

We Say...

For proper consumption of Sonny & the Sunsets' debut LP Tomorrow Is Alright, it is probably best to keep it tethered to the Earth with an anchor or a heavy stone. That's not to say that the album's 10 tracks are slight, exactly, but there is a certain level of casualness (one might go as far to call it "stoniness") that makes each song feel like...
For proper consumption of Sonny & the Sunsets' debut LP Tomorrow Is Alright, it is probably best to keep it tethered to the Earth with an anchor or a heavy stone. That's not to say that the album's 10 tracks are slight, exactly, but there is a certain level of casualness (one might go as far to call it "stoniness") that makes each song feel like it might just float away.

This is on purpose, of course. Frontman and mastermind Sonny Smith cut his eye teeth on the blues and has traveled to a number of American cities (and Costa Rica) picking up variations on the old pluck-and-mumble along the way. Everything in Sonny's world sounds temporary and transient, from the characters in his songs to the tossed-off gentle percussion that sneak in and out of the best tunes on the album. Event the title suggests a certain laid back quality that could be mistaken for apathy.

In reality, it's just a deep dive into Smith's worldview. The story-songs that inhabit Tomorrow Is Alright are all about weathering daily disappointments and disasters with a world-weary grace (and a banjo pluck or two). "When I threw a smile your way/ You act so cold," he sings on "Stranded" in a voice that recalls Stephen Malkmus' best impression of a guy who cares. Moments like that would devastate an emo frontman, but Smith just lets the "fa la las" take over, and buy the third verse he's tossing out a whole new batch of well-wishes. "So I leave this simple song/ I hope it don't keep you too long," he sings, somewhat defeated but always optimistic (because, of course, there are more "fa la las" to come).

For a band made up of such basic elements, they make their tracks sound awfully dense. There are hints of Beach Boys-ian orchestration in the album-opening "Too Young to Burn," while "Love Among Social Animals" rolls with Byrds-ian chugging. The surface slightness ensures that Tomorrow Is Alright will require multiple listens, but the narrative and sonic gems lurking below the shruggy vibe are well worth the tenacity. If the definition of cool is making it look like it doesn't matter, then Sonny & the Sunsets are Fonzie times a thousand.

Best Coast Projected in NYC, Atlanta, Miami, Austin, LA, and Chicago

Watch the performance

Watch the performance

We felt sunshine in winter as Best Coast brought their California sound to New York’s Bowery Ballroom.

Interview With Best Coast

Interview With Best Coast

From the Beach Boys to Beach House, your next favorite band sat down with us before the show to talk about the music that inspires them.

We Say...

Bethany Cosentino moved to New York to become a writer and boomeranged back to her native Los Angeles to pen woozy dream-pop that couldn't sound more quintessentially and brilliantly California. On Best Coast's full-length debut, Crazy for You, Cosentino and industrious L.A. indie rocker Bobb Bruno mix reverb-drowned surf guitar with hip-swiveli...
Bethany Cosentino moved to New York to become a writer and boomeranged back to her native Los Angeles to pen woozy dream-pop that couldn't sound more quintessentially and brilliantly California. On Best Coast's full-length debut, Crazy for You, Cosentino and industrious L.A. indie rocker Bobb Bruno mix reverb-drowned surf guitar with hip-swiveling '60s shoop and the lo-fi girl-rock of '90s bands like That Dog. It's primo beach-blanket bop with a loveable quaint streak: more Annette Funicello than the Situation.

Like gender-flopped Beach Boys songs, the 13 lazily gorgeous tracks on Crazy for You are obsessed with boys. But love isn't idealized in Cosentino's universe — it makes her sleepy ("Crazy for You"), mentally disheveled ("Goodbye"), and apologetic ("I'm sorry I lost your favorite T-shirt, I'll buy you a new one, a better one" she sings in her flatly clean, Liz Phair-like croon on "Bratty B"). Her real romance is with that essential Cali obsession — the sun — but even that relationship falls a bit far of perfection. "There's something about the summer," she repeatedly croons on "Summer Mood" as Bruno plucks out a few breezy chords, "that makes me moody."

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